Best Time to Transplant PErennials?

Cincinnati- Zone-5 What is the best time of the year to transplant the following perennials? 1) cone flowers (purple) 2) Black eyed Susan\ 3) Lupine 4) Russian Sage 5) Hosta 6) daffodils 7) Hibiscus 8) Rose of Sharon 9) Clematis Thanks
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On Tue, 29 Jun 2004 11:29:14 +0530, FEDUP wrote:

Those 2 I do in spring when they get about 3-5 inches tall. I just dig out individual plants from the mass and transplant. I prepare the new spot first though to minimize their time out of the ground.

After the foliage dies back.
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I'm in Cincinnati, and as far as I can tell, the entire area is zone 6 except for the area around I275 near the Indiana border. If you are close to the river like in Anderson Township, then you might be zone 6b. I transplant divide and transplant everything in the spring. I usually do this between March 31st and April 15th. I find that the fall is too hot and dry unless you wait until mid October. I have too much other stuff going on then like removing dead annuals and lifting and packaging rhizomes for the winter. The exception might be the daffodils. You would probably want to move them in the fall.
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FEDUP wrote:

In our area, the best time to transplant is in very early spring or in fall. I like to move stuff in October when the weather starts cooling down. Be sure that your plants get plenty of water after they are moved. You know how dry it can be in the fall around here.
--
Bill R. (Ohio Valley, U.S.A)

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I'm in zone 5. I've transplanted black eyed susan, sage and rose of sharon any time from spring to late fall, and they all survived well. I've cut up a big hosta to more than 10 pieces in the middle of summer when they're blooming. They all survived. Last week, I divided a few of them again.
Regards

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deadhead the flower so you can distribute the seeds around the spot, and lift the plants.

they've bloomed themselves and then returned for me the next year.

else. I've done this many many times.

full flower, had them drop every leaf, and Squire has told me to leave it alone and sure enough, come September, there were little new leaves on the branches and the bush bloomed the next year when it was supposed to.

Mountain in Eastern Tennessee zone 7, Sunset zone 36

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