Best ground cover to walk on?

Page 1 of 2  
We have a new street tree in front. NYC's standard tree pit size is now 4-1/2 x 9 feet. It is right along the curb. With nine feet along the curb there will be people getting out of cars and into the pit.
So what ground cover can take this the best? It would seem to me that myrtle/perrywinkle would be better than English ivy, which would be better than pachysandra.
Other plants (e.g. spring bulbs) could be added further from the curb.
Don http://foraging.com/ e-mail at page bottom.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

In NYC unless you first enclose that space with a heavy gauge wrought iron fence you're wasting your time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 14 Jul 2011 10:18:07 -0400, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

Iron hoops were installed on three sides by the neighbor I share the pit with. There are none on the street side, allowing doors to open.
Don http://foragingpictures.com/ e-mail at page bottom.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If car doors open onto that area so people can disembark and step there then just how long do you think anything you plant there will last? Perhaps you need to consider planting pavers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
this site is very useful for me...
--
alenaalberta1


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/14/11 7:01 AM, Don Wiss wrote:

I think the preferred term is "tree well", not "tree pit".
Any ground cover will freeze in the winter. Walking on it then will leave dead patches the size and shape of shoe prints.
Consider a tree grate. This would be two open-work steel or iron panels that lie flat on the ground over the tree well. Where they meet, they form a hole for the trunk of the tree.
Tree grates are not fastened into place. They can be lifted to work on underground utilities running in the area. They might need replacement as the tree outgrows the hole for the trunk.
With a tree grate, you have two choices: * You can fill the spaces in the grate with coarse sand, bringing the soil surface to the height of the top of the grate. This prevents someone walking over the tree well from tripping. But it is not attractive. * You can plant a ground cover in the spaces. The grate will protect the bottom inch or so of each plant from damage when someone walks there in the winter. But this is quite a hazard for a woman in high heels.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Never heard tree well used around here. It is not lower then the sidewalk. Often they are slightly higher.

Well, if there is a lot of snow there will be snow banks along the side and people will have to get out the other side of the car. We could intentionally pile a lot of snow into the pit to discourage stepping into it. As long as the honey locust and any plants underneath don't mind wet feet.
And with global warming we will have less time when it is below freezing at the times people would be using their cars.

Thanks for the suggestion, but no. Remember I have nine feet along the curb. The new large size is to capture more rain water and have less run into the sewers.
Don http://foraging.com/ e-mail at page bottom.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don Wiss wrote:

If it's not lower than the sidewalk then why do you keep refering to that area as a "pit"? I think you need to post a photograph depicting the entire area so everyone can see what you're talking about. I lived in NYC for many years and I know that every curbside planting area presents a different situation. You haven't really given a description, you've not mentioned whether it's a business or residential situation, or who is responsible for its care... you haven't even said if it's in full sun, part shade, or full shade, and what kind of soil, which are very important considerations for suggesting a ground cover planting.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 14 Jul 2011 17:06:22 -0400, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

Because that it what they are called around here. See the official instructions on caring for it:
http://www.nycgovparks.org/sub_your_park/trees_greenstreets/tree_care_tips/tree_pit_care.html

Okay. Here it is:
http://donwiss.com/pictures/misc/treepit.jpg
The hoops are new. Right now the soil is compacted from the people walking on it pre-hoops. I need to loosen it up. And I have a bag of Sweet Peet that I will add.

Residential with low parking turnover. And on the car's passenger side.

That's between me and the neighbor that I share the pit with. We both have hoses out front and we both garden. But I am usually home and they are usually not.

It gets morning sun. Sometimes filtered through a honey locust tree.
Don. http://paleofood.com/kitchen-equipment.htm (e-mail at page bottom).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If you have those hoops on three sides I honestly don't see the point in not having the hoops at the curb as well... anyone opening a car door will exit and then have to step over to exit the area anyway, and anything planted there will get trampled regardless... and anyone stepping over those hoops will have a good chance of tripping, falling, and getting seriously hurt... there will be a law suit... it's NYC ya know.
I know that you have something else in mind but I'd fill in that entire area with paving block (making sure it's flat and even with the concrete so no one trips) leaving a good sized opening for that sapling to grow and filling it with mulch if desired... blocks can be removed to enlarge the opening at a later date as the tree grows. I would also set in a wrought iron tree guard or that puny tree won't stand a chance... have an iron shop make one about six feet tall with spikes on top so that it's not climbable (it's NYC). I'd find a couple of heavy concrete planters to set out on the blocks and fill them with annuals each spring and remove them to storage prior to each winter. I would definitely get rid of those hoops (NOW) or someone is going to own you... I'm surprised the City of NY hasn't directed you to remove those hoops and cited you for creating a dangerous nuisance. Even pedestrians just strolling on the sidewalk are apt not to see those fercocktah hoops, especially at night.
http://www.wroughtironconcept.com/wrought-iron/products?view=three_guards
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 15 Jul 2011 06:49:56 -0400, Don Wiss wrote:

Those official instructions recommend ground covers, including: - Spotted Deadnettle Lamium maculatum (Excellent groundcover) - Foam Flower Tiarella cordifolia(Vigorous groundcover with white upright flowers)
Presumably these have been tested and found satisfactory in NYC tree pits, why not go with one of them?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oh, geeze... go know... there are official instructions. By all means go with the oafficial instructions, why ask us dummies.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don Wiss wrote:

If people are going to walk on it often then there is none that will look good all year round and many that will never look very good. Pave it.
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/14/11 3:00 PM, David Hare-Scott wrote:

Don't pave it. Eventually, the tree will outgrow its hole in the paving. Furthermore, rain and snow will run off and not irrigate the tree; and tree roots might suffer from a lack of oxygen in the soil.
Consider pea gravel, coarser gravel, or rounded river stones. These just lie on the soil and allow water and air to penetrate. Another alternative is unmortared bricks in a basket-weave or herringbone pattern. All of these prevent mud from being tracked out of the area or from ensnaring someone's shoes.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David E. Ross wrote:

Better.
D
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"David Hare-Scott" wrote:

WTF are you... Mr. Good Houskeeping... how presumptuous that you think anyone needs your seal of approval. What a pompous pontificating know nothing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Brooklyn1 wrote:

What has saying to DER that I like his idea better than mine got to do with housekeeping?
As for being a know nothing we have been head to head on several occasions over some of your more foolish remarks and you are yet to get a score on the board. Why don't you grow up and find some other way to get your jollies instead of insulting people you have never met.
D
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Good luck, David, but I'm afraid that Shelly is dumber than your smarts. He is a self made fool, and probably a drunk, meaning that he is under some sort of protection from the All Mighty.
--
- Billy
America is not broke. The country is awash in wealth and cash.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What might make sense is some stepping stones. Most of the people parking here live around here, and they aren't going to deliberately want to trash a pretty tree pit.
Don. http://www.donwiss.com/pictures/ (e-mail link at page bottoms).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don Wiss wrote:

That could work okay in your backyard, but on the streets of NYC those stones are an attractive nuisance, they're great for smashing windows.

How naive... you're obviously new to NYC. Just wait until a group of boozers/druggies come staggering by at 3AM.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.