BER tomato good for anything?

I just picked off a green tomato with a brown bottom. I wonder if it's good for anything (e.g. seeds) besides composting and throwing during bad vaudeville shows.
How developed are the seeds? The tomato is about normal size (as you might see in a supermarket), but still 100% green. I don't know what variety it is or if it's open pollenated (though I'm willing to take my chances with F2's).
My seed saver notes say use fully ripe tomatoes and that tomatoes don't ripen after they've been picked.
I don't have any pets.
-- Salty
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On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 15:28:31 GMT, Salty Thumb

Blossom End Rot isn't a disease, but a "condition," so it's OK to cut off the spoiled bits and eat the rest. Every year I buy a couple of green tomatoes at the farmers mkt, intending to try making fried green tomatoes, but rarely get around to it. The tomatoes stay out in the kitchen, and eventually ripen. When I cut them open, often many of the seeds have germinated, and I have a tomato-ful of little tadpoles. Not much good for seed-saving. :-) However, you *could* try making...fried green tomato slices.
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Thanks for the reply. Unfortunately my clean freak girlfriend decided to chuck the poor tomato yesterday. I was hoping to open it and see if I had seeds or 'tadpoles'. (The bottom looked a little too nasty for me to eat the top part).
-- Salty
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