Bees

The ice has melted and the quarter million folks down the road almost have all the power back on. The sun is out and temps should go up to 50's and 60's in a day or so. So, I am planning to get some clean-up and prep work started.
What can I do to help out in bringing back some bees? As I am inside a national forest, there is no widespread spraying here'bouts, and my neighbors and I don't use harsh stuff except as a last resort in very small areas. I don't want to KEEP bees, anymore than I keep bats, even though I have mounted bat houses here and there. I just want do do what might help.
Things I have considered is: 1. After I have burned and disked some meadows, putting in some clover, along with the other native grasses. 2. Leaning toward bee-friendly flowers when selecting annuals this year.
Any other ideas?
cheers
oz, feverish from the cabin
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MajorOz wrote:

Yes, read the book "Fruitless Fall" by Rowan Jacobsen. It covers all the problems of the collapse of the honey bee. I couldn't put it down.
Sherwin
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Thank you.
Does it offer the kinds of solutions that I, as a small landowner, can do?
cheers
oz
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MajorOz wrote:

It is not a cure all type book, but should give you some insight into the possible dangers of hive collapse and possible work arounds. In any case, it is well written and informative.
Sherwin
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Burning the meadows will likely decrease the numbers and types of bees on your land as a diversity of plants ( weeds to some) that flower at different times will promote the greatest numbers of bees. Leaving some wild patches will protect your pollinators.
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On Sat, 7 Feb 2009 05:47:53 -0800 (PST), beecrofter

I planted borage, the "bee plant" last year. Not sure how much it made a difference, but it did draw bees into my yard. I had a bumper blueberry crop last summer.
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I grew borage once the idea was to candy the flowers. Do not remember much so it was a failed endeavor. Maybe not for you?
<http://earthnotes.tripod.com/borage.htm
Bill
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA






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Thank you. That is the idea. My meadows were once a variety of native grasses and wildflowers. My intent is to get rid of the invasive fescue (a boon to the cattle producers, but death-on-wheels to many critters -- principally quail) that has invaded. These are small meadows in almost virgin hardwood forest inside a NF, with brush piles and occasional red cedar and nearby year-round water. Everything for the critters except decent ground cover. My major intent is quail restoration and general wildlife habitat improvement, but I have recently thought that there might be something I could do ALONG WITH IT to help out the bee problem.
cheers
oz, watching the rain fill the pond
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In message

Very interesting .... please keep us posted. I am going through a similar process with a small wildflower meadow and bees in Dorset/UK. Here I needed to impoverish the soil by various means to enable the wildflower seed to set and thrive. Also needed to sow some parasitic Yellow Rattle to reduce the strong growing lush grass - previously field was used for cattle grazing. Now into third year and we have been delighted at the progress. The meadow is now beginning to look as old, unmanaged meadows looked a couple of hundred years ago - and the bees and butterflies love it.
So keep at it and let us know how things progress.
Good Luck!
--
Gopher .... I know my place!

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Wonderful. I hope I am as successful.

I will

Thank you
cheers
oz, listening closely for peepers in the pond
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Never heard of this can anyone explain?
Bill
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA






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State. I'm sure some good hearted soul will not treat the response as cynical amusement and interpret it in English, which is, after all, the language of your State too.
I will now retire smartly anticipating the inevitable backlash:-))
--
Gopher .... I know my place!

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No backlash here. Just this idea is something alien as my life is devoted to improving the soil for future folks. I can impoverish by just taking out and not returning which is very easy.
Surely a concept that has many meanings.
Bill
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA






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Don't go on being rational, Bill, he has obviously lost any grasp that he had on reality and has just disappeared. Simple question, drama queen answer.
--

Billy
Republican and Democratic "Leadership" Behind Bars
  Click to see the full signature.
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In message

Sorry Bill you're absolutely right. Having lurked around the group for a time I confused Bill with Diehard Billy. I should have known better and been more careful.
In fact, if anyone wishes to grow original indigenous wildflowers it is necessary to reduce the fertility of the soil to the lower levels which were in place before the fertilisation by man necessary to grow crops and produce. Then competing growth of grass etc. is not so strong and allows the wild flowers to grow rather than be choked. Usually only small areas - rather like gardens/yards - are set aside for this purpose largely to encourage wildlife including bees which benefit greatly from the change.
OK Billy Boy? Now holster your pistols before you hurt someone:-))
--
Gopher .... I know my place!

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I figured that was what you meant. There are quite a few herbs that won't grow well on "improved" soil. I'd see mullein growing all over town but it took years for me to get it established in the yard. The soil was too rich.
Kate - hawthorne trees are beginning to bud out - middle TN
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