Bedroom Plants

Hi,
I want to purchase a plant for my room. I know all plants give off Oxygen but are there any plants in particular that give off more Oxygen then others and if so does anyone know what they are called please?
Thanks
--
Bhavick


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bhavick wrote:

The ones that are doing the most photosynthesis, which would be the ones growing fast in sunlight which you don't have in your bedroom.
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Spider plants give off the most oxygen for an indoor plant. Spider plants have the least problems also. One thing about spider plants, they can be poisonous to cats.
--
Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan L wrote:

How do you know this?
D
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It was a discussion in the Master Gardener class on indoor plants. Instructor talking about spider plants being the best to remove toxins from the room. Also a side benefit was more oxygen was produced in the process.
http://www.ehow.com/list_6626617_highest-oxygen-yielding-house-plants.html
--
Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan L wrote:

Most of the references including this one seem to ultimately stem from the NASA clean air study which was all about the ability of common house plants to remove toxins from the environment. It did not measure the oxygen produced. Your ref mentions "a study in 1985" which I cannot track down. No doubt general statements that plants do produce an excess of oxygen in the long term are true. I remain very sceptical that the amount of oxygen that indoor plants could produce in a normal bedroom would be discernible or sufficient to be of any benefit.
David.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hmmm...
The question was not of benefit. Just asked which one produces the highest oxygen levels. If one does choose an indoor plant, might as well pick a highly rated one. Also my bedrooms are facing the south with over sized windows in each room. So the plants get lots of sunlight and under each window is a heat register. Even if the plants do not have a south facing window one can use grow lights.
I was also reading years ago about the failures of the bio-dome years ago about plants and the CO2 levels and the need for scrubbers. The second dome worked but failed finically and the research was not completed. If long distance space travel ever becomes reality, plants will be needed for air quality. I am for more research in this area.
One thing about living in the frozen cold north. One can still garden indoors. Seed kits begin in February.
--
Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Seems unlikely. Plants require CO2 to make O2, and presently CO2 is at about 290 parts per million (ppm) in the atmosphere. Consuming all the CO2 in a room, wouldn't make a noticeable difference in the O2 level as every 6 molecules of CO2 gives rise to 6 molecules of O2. If your going to do the stociometry, don't for get the 6 molecules of H2O and the molecule of sugar (C6-H12-O6).
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yup, plants in the dark *use* oxygen.
    Una
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Dec 15, 7:17am, snipped-for-privacy@att.net (Una) wrote:

I'm not sure you can say they *use* oxygen.....during the day when photosynthesis is going on, they emit oxygen but at night when photosynthesis is NOT active they release carbon dioxide. Not quite the same as *using* oxygen :-) Many - if not most - houseplants are considered to be beneficial to indoor air quality. In addition to releasing oxygen, they also are able to filter various toxins. The issue is the light levels during the day when photosynthesis is active. Ideally, you would want pretty high light levels so as to maximize photosynthesis but at night the issue is moot. Googling will turn up various listings of plants considered being the most efficient at improving indoor air quality; here is one to get you going: http://www.dannylipford.com/best-houseplants-to-improve-indoor-air-quality /
Several of these are tolerant of quite low light levels so may be more appropriate for a bedroom wher light levels, even during the day, tend to be low. I'd include the peace lily, English ivy, pothos and the spider plant among these. FWIW, spider plants will grow ANYWHERE and since they are generally a hanging plant, typically above the reach of most pets.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

<http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/housepl/houseplt2.ht ml>
"In a laboratory test, a spider plant placed in a sealed chamber filled with formaldehyde gas reduced the concentration by 85 percent within 24 hours. In an average-sized house, as few as 15 plants might significantly cleanse the air"
We have three spider plants but no formaldehyde hopefully.
--
Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

"Always tell the truth and you don't have to remember anything."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill who putters wrote:

And hopefully the OP doesn't have it in his bedroom.
D
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
gardengal wrote:

Whether these plants absorb pollution is a different question.
D
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

The presence or absence of oxygen determines how the process (respiration) will progress. If oxygen is present, products from glycolysis will be used within the mitochondria, or energy centers, of the cell, to continue respiration. If oxygen is not present, fermentation, a less efficient use of energy, occurs.

--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Full sunlight, well watered and amended soil, and 85F (30C) temp.
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bhavick wrote:

02 generating plant: (Amazon.com product link shortened)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/15/2010 10:09 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)= [citation needed] for their claim "More healthy level is 30% [O2]".
--
The word "urgent" is the moral of the story "The boy who cried wolf". As
a general rule I don't believe it until a manager comes to me almost in
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.