Bean and Tomatoe question

Bean problem:
http://zootal.no-ip.info/stuff/2008/2008JulyGarden3/images/DSCF3107.JPG
This is a chineese noodle bean, and it is not happy. I have a row of Blue Lake pole beans 2 feet away that are growing fine. All of the noodle beans look like this. I don't believe it's insect damage. The weather has been in upper 70s, lower 80s. Water is about an inch a week. Soil is well drained, moderately rich loam. Growth is slow, and leavs are discolored and tend to curl at the edges. All of them seem to do it. Once the get past a certain size, the plants grow well, it only seems to happen when they are young. Does anyone recognize this, or have any suggestions?
Tomatoe problem:
I have on plant that is developing discolored curling leaves:
http://zootal.no-ip.info/stuff/2008/2008JulyGarden3/images/DSCF3097.JPG
http://zootal.no-ip.info/stuff/2008/2008JulyGarden3/images/DSCF3098.JPG
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On Sat, 26 Jul 2008 10:09:41 -0700, "Zootal"

Try this for ID....
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/tomatoproblemsolver/index.html
Charlie
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<Charlie> wrote in message wrote:

The closest match is Alternaria Canker. It doesn't really tell you much about it. I looked around for more information, but most web sites seem to just copy each other. I gotta wonder how this one plant got it? It's in the middle of the row, and everyone else around it is happy. I think I'll remove the plant, and treat it's neighbors with a fungicide, as that seems to be all I can do at this time. Several documents call for an application of chlorothalonil.
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On Sat, 26 Jul 2008 10:53:42 -0700, "Zootal"

Uhh....do you really think chlorothalonil is a good idea?
http://www.pesticideinfo.org/Detail_Chemical.jsp?Rec_Id=PC34550
Charlie
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Not sure. I think a copper spray, which can also control this, might be a better choice. Chlorothalonil is a very common fungicide, used commercially on potatoes and tomatoes, but it breaks down to toxic compounds, and is slightly carcinogenic. No one really knows what the long term effects are as the symptoms observed in the lab haven't been observed in nature. It's been used since the 1960s, IIRC. There are certainly worse things I can use, but I still prefer something a little safer, hence my preference for copper.
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Anyone recognize the bean symptom? It almost looks like a disease except the plants usually outgrow it. My first guess would be that they just don't like the climate/soil. The seeds come from China, and I have no idea what kind of environment they are raised in.

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On Sun, 27 Jul 2008 14:45:34 -0700, "Zootal"

I've found that often what we observe of disease or problems is taken care of by the plant itself or actually causes little problem, other than cosmetic. I had bean beetles show up and became concerned, but they did littel damge and disappeared. Same for flea beetles on the eggplant, which years a decimated my crop. Found three hornworms so far is all, despite an abundance of adult sphinx working the flowers. Maybe the cardinals are doing their job. I pay the effers enough in sunflower seed.
Not always the case, of course.
Often time is the best cure. And of course healthy soil. Each year that passes without my using any chemicals on my plants or soil and continuing to build with organic matter, compost, etc, and never tilling, I am finding fewer and fewer pests and problems.
Except for the damned cabbage looper things that love anything brassica and wear me out handpicking catters and piss me off to no end. I've likely done more damage by flailing away at the flying forms and breaking plants than the worms destroy. ;-) This year I am planting those things soon and try for a fall crop.
I raised chinese noodle beans last year, and seem to remember some funky stuff early in their development. While interesting and a curiosity, I couldn't get anyone here to be excited about them, other than me. I did rather like them stirfried. I also enjoy carp, so I guess I'll eat anything. We won't go into the culinary insect experiments that are ongoing. ;-0
Care Charlie
"The fair-weather gardener, who will do nothing except when the wind and weather and everything else are favorable, is never master of his craft."-- Henry Ellacombe
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Um, yeah...my son is very much into culinary insect experiments .... <shudder>
When do you plant cabbages and stuff for a fall crop? Do you direct seed them, or start in pots/planters?
I grew the chinese noodle bean last year, but they did not do very well. They did outgrow the deformed leaf stage when younger, but were never very vigorous, nor did they produce much. I'm guessing they just don't like my garden, but I'm not sure what they do like.
I have flea beetles and cucumber beetles, spotted and striped, so many that they decimated my beans and melons, and darn near destroyed my eggplants. I tried a few different things, but finally settled on neem oil applied every 4 days or so. They don't seem to like it, and the plants are just about big enough that the beetle damage will no longer bother them.
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