Bark eaten off apple tree - advice?

We have an 8 year old Macintosh apple tree that has been bearing beautifully for several years. Now, this winter, we see that something (rabbits we suspect) has eaten the bark off 6-8 inches up from the ground. Is there any hope for this tree? Any way to save it? Any advice will be greatly appreciated.
Wayne
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Depends how far around the tree the cambium is missing. If it has been stripped all the way around, there is no hope. Cambium is the inner bark that carries water and nutrients between the roots and the crown.
If you cut down the tree you may get root suckers but unless you are completely sure the tree grew on its own roots (was not grafted), you probably should not cultivate the suckers. The root stock rarely produces satisfactory fruit.
    Una
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On 3/16/2010 4:53 PM, Una wrote:

That would be my advice, too. I had rabbits do in an almond tree and sucker from root stock was a not, too good peach. Finally cut it down. Rabbits will do this when snow piles up and there is nothing else to eat.
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http://southernfood.about.com/od/venisongame/r/bl31c3.htm
Gut em right away cut off head , paws pull off skin soak in salted water.
Gruesome but similar to de heading chicken and then plucking or skinning. Hot water and resolve all that is needed.
--
Bill Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA
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On Tue, 16 Mar 2010 18:09:53 -0400, Bill who putters

I gotta add, Bill, for those who don't have old-fashioned knowledge (and I know you do), have a care about tularemia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tularemia ).... and fleas. Plus, if you have a sensitive tummy related to smells, dress 'em outside.
Rabberts die easily, a pellet gun will take care of them with little noise to alert the cute-bunny-lovers.
Charlie
The crafty rabbit has three different entrances to its lair Chinese Proverb
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Charlie[_2_];880413']On Tue, 16 Mar 2010 18:09:53 -0400, Bill who putters
snipped-for-privacy@snip.net wrote:
- Gut em right away cut off head , paws pull off skin soak in salted water.
Gruesome but similar to de heading chicken and then plucking or skinning. Hot water and resolve all that is needed.-
I gotta add, Bill, for those who don't have old-fashioned knowledge (and I know you do), have a care about tularemia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tularemia ).... and fleas. Plus, if you have a sensitive tummy related to smells, dress 'em outside.
Rabberts die easily, a pellet gun will take care of them with little noise to alert the cute-bunny-lovers.
Charlie
The crafty rabbit has three different entrances to its lair Chinese Proverb
there are a lot of things sold on the market that u can put on your tree
but i would fence the area in as brooklyn1 mentioned, cut off any jagged edges or ripped up bark as carefully as u can.
other than that all u can do is wait and keep talking to your tree and yes
i do mean talking even though i know there are some that dont believe in it.
i think most gardeners talk with their plants, trees, etc and if they say they dont well who am i to say if they do or not ;) lolol.
good luck with your tree:). cyaaaaaaa, sockiescat:).
--
sockiescat


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On Mar 17, 10:18am, sockiescat <sockiescat.

Thanks for the responses. I kind of think the tree is done for, too, but will wait to see what happens when the others start to leaf out. And I appreciate the recipe for rabbit stew.
Wayne
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On Mar 17, 11:55am, " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

If the bark is stripped all the way around the tree, I wonder if it would be possible to graft a couple of strips of bark cut from higher off the trunk in a vertical direction to bridge the gap and get a complete cambium again.
Paul
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Pavel314 wrote:

If that is what you want to do search bridge graft on google. A bunch of interesting links come up. I've never tried it myself. -DOug
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"wayne.deloach" wrote:

If when other fruit tres nearby are leafing and blossoming but yours isn't then your tree is kaput. But meanwhile I'd place a barrier around the trunk to deter whatever ate it from continuing... should have fenced the minute you noticed, even before posting here.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com;880376 Wrote: > We have an 8 year old Macintosh apple tree that has been bearing

why don't you try to put some barrier like putting fence around it, enough that would protect it from the apple-eating-rabbits.
--
ezylala


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Hi...All...
I have read this Apple is very important is our health But you have an 8 year old Macintosh apple tree that is great
Any advice will be greatly appreciated. thank you
--
maxbill89


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http://www.foodnews.org/fulllist.php
RANK, FRUIT OR VEGGIE, SCORE 1 (worst) Peach 100 (highest pesticide load) 2 Apple 93 3 Sweet Bell Pepper 83 4 Celery 82 5 Nectarine 81 6 Strawberries 80 7 Cherries 73 8 Kale 69 9 Lettuce 67 10 Grapes - Imported 66 11 Carrot 63 12 Pear 63 13 Collard Greens 60 14 Spinach 58 15 Potato 56 16 Green Beans 53 17 Summer Squash 53 18 Pepper 51 19 Cucumber 50 20 Raspberries 46 21 Grapes - Domestic 44 22 Plum 44 23 Orange 44 24 Cauliflower 39 25 Tangerine 37 26 Mushrooms 36 27 Banana 34 28 Winter Squash 34 29 Cantaloupe 33 30 Cranberries 33 31 Honeydew Melon 30 32 Grapefruit 29 33 Sweet Potato 29 34 Tomato 29 35 Broccoli 28 36 Watermelon 26 37 Papaya 20 38 Eggplant 20 39 Cabbage 17 40 Kiwi 13 41 Sweet Peas - Frozen 10 42 Asparagus 10 43 Mango 9 44 Pineapple 7 45 Sweet Corn - Frozen 2 46 Avocado 1 47 (best) Onion 1 (lowest pesticide load)
If you already grow your own, and want it to be as good as commercial produce, go to a nursery or hardware store, purchase the pesticide of your choice, and spray on fruit and veggies to taste.
--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
merger of state and corporate power." - Benito Mussolini.
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In article

Good to see avocados are low on the list, since I cannot grow them in Michigan. I eat about 3 avocados per week, bananas 3 per month.
Also, thanks for the reminding me to prune my apple trees, now is the time for pruning :)
Enjoy Life... Dan
--
Garden in Zone 5 South East Michigan.

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