bare lawn areas on a steep slope

There is an area on a steep slope where I need grass to grow. I planted seed two years ago and it is now established but there is a very steep area (too steep to operate a lawn mower easily) about 60 x 5 feet that needs seeding. How should this be re-seeded without rain washing it down the hill? I don't have a choice of another ground cover, and I need to use the same seed as the rest of the lawn. Do those seeding mats work well to control washing out?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why can't you use a different ground cover? You say the area's too steep to mow. If you *did* get grass to grow, are you OK with it determining its own height?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 12 Mar 2006 15:31:16 GMT, "Doug Kanter"

I am the gardener, not the owner and I could not convince the owner to plant another ground cover (he says he already spent over $2000 on that hill). I can still cut it using a string trimmer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Jeez...sounds like the guy's never seen a nice planting of pachysandra, which requires no care except to look at it and smile every so often.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Try aerating extensively, then watering, then seeding. The holes from aerating should give you a place where the seeds can avoid being washed away. So they clump. Give extra water (a real must on a slope) so the clumps are induced to spread.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 12 Mar 2006 16:56:20 -0500, "Jim Voege"

Any chance you could re-negotiate with the *U^Y%$)_+ who would not accept advice on sturdy ground cover?
(Unless you have already done the following: <g>) Print out in polite, modified form the excellent comments in this thread. Possibly show him "evidence" from a good gardening book. Somehow get him to accept that a sturdy ground cover is both aesthetically pleasing and in his long-range interest.
Good luck!
Persephone
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Phisherman said:

Years ago I had to seed a sloping area of sandy soil. I laid cheese cloth down over the area that I had seeded. The new grass easily sprouted through the cheese cloth and the cheese cloth eventually rotted away.
--
Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Burlap works, too, which is why garden centers sell so much of it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 13:48:30 GMT, "Doug Kanter"

Burlap is a good idea. And to all the other posts about suggesting another ground cover--it makes sense but that's a no-go because the customer is the boss.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

He's an idiot, and you can tell him I said so. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi!, it is difficult to give any meaningful advice not knowing what kind of grass you are talking about, and where you are located, but here is an opinion, you might consider.
First the burlap or the seeding mats, will probably create problems down the road(my opinion). I have noticed the highway department, when seeding very steep inclines simply seeds and then puts thin layer of straw over the area. They use a shredder to cut the straw into small clippings and then blow it over the area.
Another method is called Plugging or Sprigging. In the spring you can buy mats of grass(much like carpet) at your local garden center. You can cut these into squares and set them out on the slope, much as you would ground cover. Or you can create your own sprigs by starting the grass elsewhere and after it is established, transplant it to the slope.
Hope this helps- -The Oldtimer

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why? I've used for years to keep birds away from seed, and to keep heavy rains from splattering the seed into clumps. Once the grass starts growing, the burlap always lifts off easily without disturbing anything.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Great, I never realized that burlap was that manageable. My thoughts were that you would leave it there to decay.
On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 13:16:44 GMT, "Doug Kanter"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.