Bandaid needed?

I have a 25' carrotwood tree, trunk diameter 7". (See photo One) It was bifurcated. To prevent splitting, I cut off the smaller of the two trunks with an almost vertical cut.
http://i302.photobucket.com/albums/nn96/wer11111/100_2346.jpg
This left a large wound, about 4"x8", where the two bifurcations had been joined. (See photo 2)
http://i302.photobucket.com/albums/nn96/wer11111/100_2345.jpg
Do I need some kind of dressing or bandaid, or whatever, to allow this big gash to heal? What happens if I do nothing?
Thanks
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Walter
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There is constant debate as to treat or not treat a wound. On the Gulf Coast I have seen wound paint to be very effective, particularly with our high heat and humidity.. I would like to see a shot at 90 degrees to the wound picture to see the side of the cut, you may want to trim the leave a little bit for better healing. In any event, if the cut has been open as it appears to be from the split in the bark, treatment is late.
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Here is a side photo and a close-up of the cut. There is a dark area in the center of the cut. Makes me wonder if this is some kind of rot that may go all the way through to the remaining trunk.
http://i302.photobucket.com/albums/nn96/wer11111/100_2351.jpg
http://i302.photobucket.com/albums/nn96/wer11111/100_2349.jpg
Thanks for any input. It's a nice tree. I hate to lose it. We live in the inland (dry) areas of San Diego.
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I would trim the cut back so there is no protruding "point', making the cut more or less in line with the remaining stem.
Hard to tell about the center crack and dark wood, I am not familiar with the species, so on a guess, no, should not be a problem, but, would not hurt to treat with wound paint after the trim. Many species may have an internal crack like that from stress, wind, snow, etc.

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On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 19:30:08 -0500, "Don Staples"

I agree with your last sentence. Trees with such steep crotch systems almost always have problems with checking and it looks like this particular split led to what appears to be necrotic tissue. I wouldn't dress this wound. However, either way, you may still lose the tree. I say plant another tree, better tree, near it so when it does decline you will have already replaced it.
When the tree first puts out foliage, how does it look? Do leaves stem out all along the limbs or is there a good canopy?
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The tree is evergreen. The canopy is very open. Leaves seem rather reluctant to come out. I suppose, this confirms your diagnosis.
Thank you, all.
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First trees do not heal wounds they seal wounds, sometimes. Wound dressing idea will never go away. They want you to believe all you have to do is paint it black and you can do anything to a tree. As if it was a forgiveness of sin. It don't work that way.
Wound Dressing: http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/W/wound_dressing.html
also ISA publication: http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/hardtoget/dressing_13/index.html
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cresote) to close the wound and suppress micoorganisms?

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Billy wrote:

Is there such an item or should there be? I have always been in the don't dress wounds camp but - http://na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/misc/woundedtrees/treat.htm says: "apply wound dressing if desired and suggests using it to prevent oak wilt disease from untreated wounds on oak trees."
http://www.utextension.utk.edu/publications/spfiles/SP683.pdf says: "Wound dressings do not stop decay or prevent entrance of decay mechanisms. Covering wounds with sealants inhibits oxidative processes,which in turn will reduce callus formation and compartmentalization. For these reasons, applying wound dressings is not recommended."
And http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/3000/3045.html While suggesting that dressings are not needed. says: "A light application of tree wound dressing does indicate that someone attended to the problem and may make a pruning job look better or more professional."
To the OP, this is a tough spot to cut and expect the tree to callous properly. I think, in this case, the collar has been compromised and the proper finish cut would not be done with a chainsaw. I maintain that if you are in the USA, then cut it down as it is ecologically disastrous.
HTH -_- how
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I've already taken this beating from Kay Lancaster. Please schedule future beatings with her.
All I asked was the "All American" question of, why not?

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Billy wrote:

thinking it was some sort of plastic coating. While it would be a plastic it apparently is one that requires heat to cure and not practical in this situation. I bit on this because of my lack of understanding of plastics and the fact that the US Forestry Service while not advocating wound dressings in general does require them in the case of oak trees to keep a certain wilt at bay. BTW the link posted was not correct, this one is, go to #10 "Prevention of spread" http://www.na.fs.fed.us/fhp/ow/states/wi/ordinance.shtm So, if you were fishing for an uninformed chemist you got one. If not explain please.
L8R -_- how
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My presumption that the "wound dressing" isn't for the recovery of the tree but rather to block a potential site of infection. Lacking an infectious vector that could utilize a wound, I would leave it alone.
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Walter R. wrote:

Hi, It's a carrotwood (Cupaniopsis anacardioides), the best cut on these is ground level. http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/cuan1.htm http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AG111
HTH -_- how
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The second picture you have included bark on that stub. The first target would be as close to the trunk as you can get without injuring the trunk or parent stem. Some companies for aesthetics reasons dig down carefully to the bottom or the crack. Would dressing will not help this situation. proper mulching would help the tree recover from the would dramatically compared to the wound dressing with a value of -1%. I would recommend an application of microelements with nitrogen as close to zero as possible. We mulch with 3 -4 year old tree trimmings. Highest quality except for our Mericle Mulch which we are taking orders for next year now. Mericle mulch would be quareenteed composted wood chips and leaves fro a specific species. E.g, Pin oak for pin oak. White pine, Hemlock and beech for the like. We keep it back at least 6" from the trunk or trunk flare of the tree. No more than 3-4" an thick. do read the following information for details on things like why you should not dig up the grass. I would fertilize this trees in addition to the mulch with a highest quality formulation or solution we have which has all of the micro-elements in it and some bio-stimulators. This treatment plan can make a big or shall I say huge difference in your trees vitality. That's the way to help the tree. "Treat the system, not just the wound (Dr. Alex L. Shigo). Mulching - http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/M/mulch.html
Pruning http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/tree_pruning
Fertilization (See A Touch of Chemistry) http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/CHEM.html
Troubles in the Rhizosphere http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/RHIZO.html
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Consulting Tree Biologist www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss. Some people will buy products they do not understand and not buy books that will give them understanding.

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[snip]
You're fighting the wrong problem. If you do nothing you're still going to have a noxious weed that is not an asset in your landscape and ought to be eliminated (unless you're living in Australia). Florida is trying to remove all carrotwood trees because of their impact.
The U. of Fl. says: "Carrotwood has been listed . . . as one of Florida's most invasive plant species since 1995 and was added to the Florida Noxious Weed List . . . in 1999. [These plants] may not be introduced, possessed, moved, or released without a permit."
Quit trying to save it -- replace it with a better species. There are a lot of better trees out there.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AG111 will tell you how to remove it and offer suggestions for trees to replace it. The Gumbo Limbo, hollies, Tabebuia and others on their list are much more attractive than this pest plant.
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