Avoiding the dangers of Roundup

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from snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com contains these words:

It would be good if he did, but the last thing a new arrival to any rural area should do, is start trying to suggest to the resident farmers that you know how they should run their business. Nothing could be more calculated to put his back up, just when you want him to be your friend, and let you know (minimum) what times of year he sprays and (best for you) get to the point where he calls on the phone to say "I'll be spraying tomorrow if it's not too windy".
In answer to your other question; I don't know. It's something you could ask him. Bear in mind chemical spraying costs him money so no sensible farmer is likely to use more than he needs, or on a day when it will blow around and miss the target.
Janet
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Janet Baraclough wrote:

Janet, well written, well stated and a good piece of advice.
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contains these words:

especially if he's going to be telling the farmer that RoundUp is a pesticide... nothing like making yourself look *really* ignorant when confronting a farmer about his spraying schedules. for the most part no one is going to be spraying if it's likely to wind drift (too expensive/wasteful) anyway, but i can't say i know much about canola... lee
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RoundUp is a pesticide. It kills pesty plants. Pesticide is a broad term that includes insecticides, fungicides, rodenticides, and herbicides.
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Gil Faver wrote:

technically you are correct and that is why the NCDA & CS uses the term on the license they issue to anyone passing their certification requirements.
in the reality of the application one would not apply a herbicide in order to kill insects. therefore classifications and categories are established so as to make labeling clear for specific use applications.
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:

<shrug> i like being a little more precise. if my (ought-to- return-to-the-city) neighbor came over & asked me not to put pesticide on the poison ivy, i'd agree with him. i'd still be putting RoundUp on it though... lee
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[sniip]

[snip]
?? Of course Roundup is a pesticide -- what's your point??
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enigma wrote:

you most likely read the thread. my blood boiled then I felt much better when I read what Janet wrote. yep, I was glad I saw what Janet wrote.
in the past you yourself have written of your experiences with newcomers and oh how I could relate.
I hope Ann in Zone 6a will elaborate on her words "unsustainability of the pesticides" because I believe she actually understands.
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Dean Hoffman wrote:
[....]

<g>
I'm voting for the older methods on more total acres. then we can 'maybe' justify stopping the urbanization of rural america.
can we vote Chicago style? <g>
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I'm curious why you crossposted this to misc.rural starting with your post to Janet. Your intro to this thread.
snipped-for-privacy@zetnet.co.uk>
You surely don't have an agenda, do you, Jim?
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Charlie wrote:

on tomorrow's list or outline of things to be considered or done
1. arrive at job site 2. remove storm windows carefully so they don't fall apart 3. scrape surfaces with wire brush 4. scrape surfaces again with metal edge scraper 5. inspect window glazing and repair as necessary 6. obtain color samples from customer and confirm color selection 7. go to paint store 8. stop by coffee shop :) 9. go to hardware store to get tubes of caulk and a better caulk gun
<g>
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<Sigh>.....'twas ever thus. As I said, I know you.
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Charlie wrote in
<quoting me instead of Jim>

i doubt sincerely my use of glyphosphate, as method of last resort, against poison ivy (to which i have a violent allergy, plus the 'remedies' for said allergy give me hives worse than the PI) is going to affect your grandchildren. i do not spray the stuff (wasteful, ineffective). i cut the vines & paint the open wound. doesn't even faze the other weeds at the base of the tree. does a good job of killing the evil vines though. just cutting the vine kills the upper portion, but PI regrows readily from the roots. painting glyphosphate on the cut kills the roots. i do agree that spraying glyphosphate is a bad thing, and spraying PI doesn't do anything toward killing the stuff unless you get a windless, dry week in very early spring as the leaves are just budding (which never happens around here anyway). if you can prove to me that this method is causing glyphosphate drift into the soil/water, i'll look into another method. as it stands now though, the PI has to go, & this is the best option i can find. lee
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enigma wrote:

on the tactical application of CBW agents. My favorite is Ortho Brush-B-Gon (Triclopyr) applied in early Spring about the time that the multiflora rose begins to leaf out. One targeted application on the PI, MFR, and other assorted jagger bushes[2] does them in. I still have to avoid the dead vines because the urushiol retains its capability to cause pain and distress (as do the jaggers).
[1]Global War On Poison Ivy [2]Anything with thorns
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snipped-for-privacy@evil.net (enigma) says...

Glyphosate takes a variable amount of time to break down, depending mostly on temperature, but it binds immediately with any clay particles it comes into contact with, which inactivates it. The antidote for accidental glyphosate ingestion is Kaopectate, which contains kaolin clay. Even a slight murkiness in the water used to mix the spray will reduce or eliminate the effectiveness of glyphosate. Essentially, once it hits the ground, it's dead. It does not transport through the soil by water motion.
It is not legal to machine apply glyphosate within 50 feet of open water. Using a hand sprayer, you can get within 10 feet.
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On Mon, 01 Oct 2007 20:51:26 -0700, Larry Caldwell wrote:

Not exactly. I've been fresh cut stump treating with Roundup for three years, mostly multiflora rose and Autumn Olive. I cut them off close to the ground and also use a paint scraper to scarify exposed roots, then brush on the Roundup. By the time I get to the end of a batch, I've carried enough soil into the container with the brush that the solution is seriously "murky", with some soil settled out on the bottom. I was concerned about this at first, but found it still was effective. So, while the glyphosate may have been adsorbed onto the surface of soil particles, it was not inactivated.

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You might find the following of interest: http://asgap.org.au/APOL20/dec00-3.html
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