Asparagus

Page 2 of 2  
snipped-for-privacy@home.net wrote:

You have to dig deep to get the crown. It will be a mass of shoots and roots. You should be able to pull it apart after you rinse the soil away. If you divide in the early spring, you don't need to keep a lot of roots; just be sure to trim away any broken roots. (It's almost like dividing bearded iris, except iris grows at the soil surface.)
Actually, asparagus don't need to be divided. However, your original message indicated that you want to have some growing where none is growing now. Given the heaviness of my own soil and the depth to which I would have to dig, I would prefer to go to a local nursery and buy a package or two of bare-root plants instead of dividing. They are not very expensive.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a question, we ordered some asparagus seeds from Gurney's, and it says that they have to be kept in damp peat moss for a week I believe, before they can be planted...is this true, or are there peat moss alternatives(because peat moss isn't readily available here, and quite expensive when it is)?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 26 Apr 2007 16:40:56 GMT, "Lilah Morgan"
|I have a question, we ordered some asparagus seeds from Gurney's, and it |says that they have to be kept in damp peat moss for a week
I would guess the advice about peat moss is just to ensure the seeds don't dry out once germination has begun. But any means you have of keeping them damp will do fine. Pre-soaking in (say) a saucer of water for a few days or a week would get them off to a good start but shouldn't be strictly necessary.
The asparagus seeds I recently bought - from Territorial in Oregon - suggest planting indoors in 3 inch peat pots "to avoid transplant shock," (ie plant the whole peat pot when setting out) and they say outdoor sowing of seed is not advised.
The other, 10-year-old seed I recently started was first put on paper towel & kept wet/damp until the little roots began to emerge - in 2-3 weeks - then planted in a potting-soil mix in little plastic pots which I keep moist. They're in a greenhouse but I think they'd be OK outside (protected from birds & critturs) so long as there's no frost.
Obviously you have to be very gentle when planting the sprouted seeds; especially if the roots have begun to knit into the paper towel, so a plain dish of water is safer. I like doing it this way because I get a kick out of seeing the little roots grow - and I can tell which seeds do/don't germinate before I plant.
Good luck. Alexander Miller.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ok thank you very much. We have an unopened package of peat pots somewhere, and I didn't pay attention to the size, but I think they might be 3inch. They're definitely not 'big' ones. I shall start soaking the seeds right away. I live in Oregon too(Klamath County), and a greenhouse is pretty essential. Though my chocolate mint and aloe vera seem to do just fine with windowsill locations.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ok I feel REALLY stupid now. I have come to realize that it was artichoke not asparagus seeds. We did have asparagus seeds, I'm just apparently operating at half capacity at best...still have the asparagus soaking though, and will do the same with the artichoke seeds if I can find them...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
|Ok I feel REALLY stupid now. I have come to realize that it was artichoke |not asparagus seeds. We did have asparagus seeds, I'm just apparently |operating at half capacity at best...still have the asparagus soaking |though, and will do the same with the artichoke seeds if I can find them... |
Haha, very good - but you didn't have to admit it!
I should warn you that when the asparagus shoots (not the roots which are white & "sturdy") come up they are almost impossible to see - about as thick as a hair and quite dark in colour. At least that's how my latest ones look - just one very flimsy inch-high thing I can barely make out against the background of the soil. Have to hold something light behind to see them.
Don't know anything about artichokes. Alexander
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<<Haha, very good - but you didn't have to admit it!>> haha well I almost didn't...I was thinking of just pretending it didn't happen, but humility is *supposed* to be good for the soul :-)
<<I should warn you that when the asparagus shoots (not the roots which are white & "sturdy") come up they are almost impossible to see - about as thick as a hair and quite dark in colour. At least that's how my latest ones look - just one very flimsy inch-high thing I can barely make out against the background of the soil. Have to hold something light behind to see them.
Don't know anything about artichokes. Alexander>>
Ok thanks again ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.