Armaryillis

This thing is growing like crazy BUT it looks like the bloom is going to be without much of a stem. What causes this in bulbs? My Tulips do the same thing in the spring. Is there anything I can do? MJ
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mj wrote:

seems a bit out of season for forcing them in the north. are you in the south (then it would be a little bit late, but probably ok).
mine are just dying back as i've withheld water, now that the light is fading and it is getting colder. they will take a few months to die back and dry out the leaves, late january i give them a drink again and they start back up. i don't want to start them too soon as there isn't much light to give them the energy they need to flower and grow.
for mine the stem keeps growing. the bud pushes out of the bulb and keeps going up for 20-30 inches before the flowers open.
or are you saying the flowers are already opening?
if that is the case i'd say not enough water, sunlight or nutrients. they can take a fair bit of water when they are actively growing.
yes tulips do the same thing. but they are not forced into hibernation like the amaryllis by the withholding of water. it's the heat of summer and the cold of winter that run the tulip growing cycle not a forced drought. the only time tulips should be dry is after they have died back in the late spring and early summer (the best time to lift them), but during the winter months the soil should not be left to dry out as that will kill the roots and probably abort the flower.
for amaryllis it would interrupt them from going dormant if you watered them in the fall.
songbird
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This is a bulb in a box Armaryillis. There was already growth when I opened and planted 2 weeks ago. It is not in bloom and maybe it is my imagination that it is the flower not just leaves. There are 2 plants , or it looks that way, coming out of the bulb. I just have no experience with forced and or indoor bulbs like this
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mj wrote: ...

when it starts growing there will be some leaf growth with a flower stalk, the flower stalk does not look at all like leaves so you'll know it if you have one.
usually the first thing out of the bulb is the flower stalk with a few small tips of the leaves and then the leaves gradually come along as the stalk gets taller.
multiple sprouts are common.
songbird
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Ok (sigh) I will try to be patient and just see what happens :) Thank you MJ
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Typically not enough chill time before flowering for the spring bulbs -- late planting, a warm spell in the winter or a warm spring may be doing this to your tulips. Consider planting cultivars that like warmer climates.
With amaryllis, it's high light, high temp or reduced watering that makes for shorter inflorescences.
Kay
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On 11/13/11 7:36 AM, mj wrote:

The first question is whether this is Amaryllis belladonna (often called 'naked lady' because it flowers when not in leaf) or some species of Hippeastrum (commonly called 'amaryllis'). See my <http://www.rossde.com/garden/garden_hippeastrum.html to distinguishthem.
"Amaryllis in a box" is usually Hippeastrum. This sends up a flower stalk at the same time new leaves sprout from the bulb. Indoors, the bulb requires strong indirect light (e.g., in a north window or behind shade cloth in an east or west window).
Hippeastrum should be planted outdoors only in mild-winter areas. While a light, overnight frost will not really injure them, they cannot withstand an actual freeze.
Indoors or outdoors, Hippeastrum can be an evergreen bulb and thus requires some water year round. In a good location and with adequate water and fertilizer, it may bloom 2-3 times a year. Water should be withheld only if the bulb goes dormant by itself without being forced into dormancy. On the other hand, A. belladonna does go dormant, which can be forced; it blooms once a year towards the end of its dormancy.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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