Are these Azaleas Dead or Merely Resting?

My front lawn is STILL mostly under snow, but the glacier has retreated enough that I can see my azalea bushes and they are not a pretty sight!
I had a problem with some kind of fungus that came on in the fall very swiftly and by now the azaleas, which are two species that are supposed to be evergreen have lost a lot of leaves. A LOT of leaves.
They look pretty dead. Is there any chance they'll grow back new leaves once it warms up? What should I be looking for to tell if they can be saved.
If they can't, I'm putting ins some cheap yews. They along with impatiens and ice pansies, seem to be all that can survive the NW exposure of the front of our house. Fortunately, no one can see the front landscaping of our house from the road, and things will grow elsewhere on the property.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, there is a chance they will come back. Loss of leaves are a symptom of a problem, not death. If the buds are still alive, then the plant should produce flowers and new growth.
The most common fungal disease of the leaves is powdery mildew. A grayish white, powdery coating or fuzzy white growth on upper or lower surfaces is azalea powdery mildew (Microsphaera azaleae). This is more prevalent on deciduous azaleas and sometimes it affects the lower surface more. Entire leaves can be covered. In late summer and fall, small black specks may be found in the white areas. Powdery mildew is more severe on shaded plants. It is favored by the high humidity found in crowded plantings and damp locations. There are a number of ways to manage this disease.
Do not overwater or overfertilize plants, as the fungus prefers succulent new growth. Hand-pick and destroy mildewed leaves to control small amounts of infection. Hose diseased plants with water when practical. This can help remove fungus and prevent new infections. Prune and space plantings to allow good air circulation. Do not plant in extremely shaded or damp areas. Rake and destroy fallen leaves year-round to reduce infection source. Do not compost diseased materials.
Chemical control is possible. Begin applications when you first notice the disease on current-year leaves. If disease appears late summer, applications are not necessary on deciduous azaleas. Do not apply sulfur products when temperature is over 85F or within a few weeks of an oil spray.
Black Leaf Sulfur Dust Bonide Lime Sulfur Spray Bonide Remedy Monterey Fungi-Fighter Ortho RosePride Funginex Ortho RosePride Orthenex Safer Flower, Fruit & Veg Garden Fungicide Spectracide IMMUNOX
This fungal disease can weaken the plant. Spray when you first see the disease and then again in 10 days. Chemicals will not control the fungi that has already become established. For more information see the section following on 'rhododendron powdery mildew'. The symptoms are different, but the organism and control are the same.
--
Pardon my spam deterrent; send email to snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net
Visit my Rhododendron and Azalea web pages at:
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for the most useful reply! The site looks very helpful too.
Stephen Henning wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.