Apple tree from seed?

Page 3 of 3  
sherwindu wrote:

For the experience.

You said that like it was a bad thing.

And the right thing is to throw away the seedling that the kid already has grown and tell him that he shouldn't have wasted his time?
The father is not proposing that they plant an apple seed and grow their own apples. You are purposely overlooking the fact that they already have a little apple tree. He has to set the kid's expectations appropriately low without killing the enthusiasm.
-Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...
Top posting fixed. <snip>

You're omnipotent enough to forcast what's going to happen in 5 years but don't believe in miracles! Wow.

Maybe he just wants to experiment, or possibly have some father son time.

        Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But we've already been told that the child will lose interest in five minutes, so the father shouldn't bother (good thing my mother 'bothered', I followed her around her herb garden and found a lifestyle I love).
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I see this kind of question every so often on this board, and I should just have a standard reply on file to answer it. Anybody who wastes their time with growing apples from seed is either an experimental station planting hundreds of them with the hope that something unusual emerges, or people like yourself who spend years nurturing this tree, only to find out that the resulting apples taste like (you know what). It's a genetic thing with the resultant tree not getting it's genes from the original tree, but something from a previous generation of that tree, which mostly does not resemble it's parent. Stone fruits have a better chance of reproducing from seed, but even that is chancy. You have as much chance of getting a good apple as winning big in the lotto. You can buy a small tree for as little as 15 to 20 dollars and you then know exactly what variety you have. Most apple trees require another 'malus' or apple family tree to pollinate for fruit, although some like Yellow Delicious are self fertile. If you have a crab apple tree, that works. If your neighbors have any of those trees, that also would probably work.
Sherwin D.
"K. Kly" wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

++++++++++++
I am sorry but I have to 100% disagree with this point.
About a dozen years ago, I bought a Navel orange tree to plant in my back yard. I was over-joyed with the delicious oranges that it produced the very first year so I decided to plant two more Navel orange trees.
I went to the nursery and checked the stock of citrus trees. Each plant had a label glued onto the pot which declared it to be a Navel orange. Each plant also had a plastic strip wrapped around the trunk saying "Navel Orange" and each plant had a large tag hanging from it with a photograph and planting instructions and specifications and "Navel Orange" declared in large letters. I picked out the two best looking ones and planted them.
As soon as they produced fruit I knew something was not right. None of the fruit had navels (Belly Buttons) on them. I watched with interest to see what the ripe fruit would be like when they ripened. One of the trees turned out to be a "Blood Orange". The fruit is small .... just a little bigger than a lemon although it is more spherical in shape than a lemon with juice that is bright red in color. It is tasty but not worth the trouble to eat. The tree is still in my back yard but only because I have not gotten around to digging it up and disposing of it. The other tree was a dissapointment at first because it was not a Navel Orange but it has turned out to be a real treasure. It produces large fruit which has seeds and no Belly Button but it has a characteristic which makes it highly desirable. The fruit ripens between Thanksgiving and Christmas and it stays fresh and delicious hanging on the tree almost the entire year long. I have no idea what type of Orange it is but I am very happy to have it.
After this experience I wanted to plant a Seckel Pear. I told the owner of the nursery about my experience with the Navel Oranges and asked, "Are you sure that these trees are Seckel Pears?" He replied, "There is no way to be sure. I had a special order for 200 Seckel pear trees. This is what my supplier shipped to me but you can never know for sure". I do not believe that what I got was a Seckel pear. The fruit does not look like the photos of Seckel pears that I have seen but it is not a bad pear either so I will not complain.
My conclusion is this. There is only one sure way to know what you are getting. Plant a seedling for rootstock. Then take a scion from a known tree of the desired type and graph it onto the rootstock. Even then the rootstock selected could possibly have a effect on the finished product. When it comes to apple trees you can buy a 5-in-1 at some nurseries. This is a potted tree with 5 different varieties graphted onto a single rootstock. Let it grow and in later years just prune off the parts that you dont like.
Them's my thoughts,
PON
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm sure there are people who buy Rolls Royces and have mechanical problems. Things occasionally go wrong even with the best plans. The question is if your experience is typical or atypical. I would say that it is not typical. You are right in that grafting known material onto root stock is a proven way to guarantee getting the tree you want, but for most of us it isn't a realistic alternative.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
vision.com says...
<snick>

<sneck>
Juice those blood oranges, they make great sangria.
If you have little kids that are into grossness, make some ice cubes with the juice then put the ice cubes in their regular OJ. Bleeding ice cubes in OJ, or just give them the juice and tell them it's Vampire Breakfast.
        Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just like with car mechanics, you better know who you are dealing with. I bought my first fruit trees from Franks Nursery 15 years ago, and they all came out as specified. Now I generally deal with mail order companies who ship small grafted whips. Even these people are not all reliable, a good indication is asking them what rootstock the tree is planted on. If they can't tell you, the warning buzzers should go off.
I'm surprised you went back to the same nursery for Seckel Pears, after your experience with the Navel Oranges.
Your suggestion about grafting your own trees is basically good, but how many people know how to graft, and how sure can you be that the scion is what you think it is. Again, there are reputable companies out there who you can depend on for sending the correct scion.
Your last suggestion for a 5 in 1 apple tree is not a good one from my experience. These kinds of trees I have found to be weak and die rather quickly.
By the way, the biggest effect of a rootstock is on the size of the tree, and in some cases its productivity, not the taste of the apples on it.
Sherwin D.
"Pseud O. Nym" wrote:

Hello, more warning bells.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

and
5
and
of
know
fruit.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Many well known apples were found originally as seedlings. That so few exist, and have not been improved, shows how unlikely your seedling will be worthwhile in the 15yrs it will take to fruit. Nothing ever grows totally true from seed and apples have such a complicated background~~ making your chances minuscule. HOWEVER you could quite simply graft your seedling onto a small branch of an existing fruiting~ age tree and then expect fruit in fewer months than years. It just might have been worthwhile. If worthwhile~ then graft on to other rootstocks and await your fortune!! Commercially millions are grown and grafted in this way each year but few, if any, become well known. Best Wishes Brian.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

++++++
This is a verbatim copy from the following URL ....
http://www.quakernet.org/MonthlyMeetings/pennvalley/history-hiatt.html
(Quote)
Did You Know?
The Red Delicious apple was discovered by a Quaker
Jesse Hiatt, a Quaker farmer in Peru, Iowa, found the seedling growing out of place in his orchard in 1872 and chopped it down. It grew back the next year and he chopped it down again. When it grew back the third year, he said, "If thee must grow, thee may."
For the next ten years, he cared for the apple seedling without knowing what it would produce. Apples freely cross breed and mutate, with results that can be spectacularly unpalatable or sublime. Jesse knew the gamble, having already developed two varieties, Hiatt Sweet and Hiatt Black.
When the tree finally produced its fruit, Jesse declared it the best- tasting apple in the world and originally named it Hawkeye after the state where he made his home with his wife and ten children. The new breed was re-christened Delicious after it won first prize in a contest in Louisiana, Missouri.
Jesse died in 1898 at the age of 72. The original Red Delicious tree survived him until the 1940s, and even after it died, sprouts grew up around the stump.
(End of Quote)
Good Luck ....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You should tell him about the guy who won the Lotto with just one ticket purchase. Have faith an someday you may hit it big.
"Pseud O. Nym" wrote:

Jesse did not casually take any old seeds to plant his tree. He knew something about the parentage of the trees he was dealing with. But I still consider him a lucky guy.
For every story like this, there are probably thousands of others where people just wasted their time and efforts. If you like really long shots, go for it.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.