Apple spraying?

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Ah ha! Rush Limbaugh is your master, your mother ship. I knew it sounded familiar. Or, do you have a relative working for Dow, who says "Of course these things are safe. How could we sell them if they weren't safe?"
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You have to spray them prior to bloom, during bloom, and each week after bloom for a couple of months. If I understand that right, that is just for the worm that goes to the core. Then you have apple maggots that come later and probably something else.
You can also put traps in your trees to get a lot of them. Some have a sweet liquid to draw the bugs in and then they drown. Another is covered with sticky stuff and when the bugs get on it, then they cant get off.
Gardens Alive has a good line of stuff for sale. I have bought from them but cant vouch for everything they have.
I get apples and pears from trees that have not been sprayed and cut out the worms.
Dwayne

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Dwayne wrote:

Each week may be a bit of overkill. You can stretch it out to two or three weeks, but it depends on how badly the trees are being attacked. For certain pests, there is a critical time to kill them, and that would be the period to hit them hard. For just general maintenance and protection, you can let it slide, a bit. Don't wait too long though, as you may miss the entry of something nasty that you weren't expecting and miss the window to stop it.

I have given up on the pheramone traps from Garden's Alive because the lures are too expensive, and I don't find them any more effective than sticky balls.

That works fine if you are the only consumer, but you don't want to give away
any damaged apples to your friends and neighbors. Reminds me of the old saying that what is worse than finding a worm in an apple? Answer: not finding it.
Sherwin D.

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The one I heard goes:
What is worse than finding a worm in an apple when you bite into it?
Answer: Half a worm.
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Right Lawrence. Yours is probably the correct one, but my memory failed me.
Lawrence Akutagawa wrote:

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Hi Ron, It would be a bit helpful to know where you are located, but not critical to this issue. The first line of defense would be a spraying of dormant oil. This will smother the eggs of the insects before they emerge. Pick a dry spell and reasonably warm days above freezing, to apply. Add a 'sticker' for retention. Too early and you may lose some effect from the washing away of the oil, and too late might miss the emergence of the insects from their eggs. I would follow up with spraying with fungicide in the Spring. You can add a pesticide to this after the petals fall from the blossoms, to avoid killing any friendly pollinator insects like bees. After this, follow up with periodic spraying every few weeks, to harvest. I would recommend a general orchard spray for this later spraying. If you find you have some really nasty bugs or fungus problems, you may have to change the sprays to something stronger and more specific. This sounds kind of nebulous, but you need to figure out what kinds of bugs and fungus are attacking your trees. You can check with your local Extension Services for assistance, if normal measures don't work. Be sure and wear a breather mask, cover all exposed skin, goggles over the eyes, and wash up good afterwards, when using the chemicals.
Sherwin D.
Ron H wrote:

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It would be helpful if you'd read. He said he was from Wisconsin.
wrote:

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Jangchub wrote:

It would also be helpful if you checked ALL the postings as I immediately followed up my posting by saying I missed his location the first time, but I corrected in my second posting.
I'm not sure the point you are trying to make with the article you referenced. Was it intended to support chemical spraying, or not. The article starts off in the first paragraph with the following:
"To successfully grow apples organically under Michigan conditions growers must recognize that the limited number of organically approved insect and disease control chemicals that are available leave them particularly susceptible to two major insect pests, Plum Curculio and Apple Maggot since no real good organic controls have been devised for these insects. Major diseases of apples can be controlled but require many frequent sprays particularly from silver tip to 4 weeks after petal fall."
I would not consider that a recommendation for total dependence on Organic spraying.
He also recommends Pyrethrum or Rotenone for Apple Maggot. I have tried both and found them inadequate. He also says that there is no effective spray for Plum Curculio, but Imidan does nicely for that, although it's distribution is restricted.
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Just noticed you are in Central Wisconsin. You can start the dormant oil on some nice day in March or April. Hopefully, the temperatures will have moderated, by then.
Sherwin D.
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Go here: http://www.canr.msu.edu/vanburen/organasp.htm
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The UW Extension has a couple of great publications on growing apples: "Growing Apples in Wisconsin" & "Apple Pest Management for Home Gardeners."
I prefer to use no or little pesticides in my garden, but considering everything I know about growing apples, I think the trade off to cut way back on chemicals is your time, e.g., hanging bait traps, monitoring for pests, etc.
Also, I think one of the reasons it's especially difficult to grow pest-free apples -- in comparison to other fruits-- is that it's probably one of the most abundant fruit plants that's grown, which contributes to the monoculture effect -- plenty of host plants to provide a "banquet" for insects & disease.
Suzy O Wisconsin, Zone 5

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