Anyone near Riverside, Washington?

I have a friend living in Riverside and she's been asking me for recommendations for some new beds in shade most of the day, wants them to flower as long as possible, perennial if possible, dry side.
I did give her some basic recommendations, but would like to know if anyone here has actual experience in that part of the Ag. zone.
They do have deer, but she is not concerned. However, plants which deer won't run to first would be good. I appreciate any recommendations. This friend is a Buddhist nun who cares for Lama Zopa Rinpoche's house, so if you believe in merit, you will certainly get some for helping with this.
many thanks, Victoria Victoria
http://gotbodhicitta-wangmo.blogspot.com/ Updated daily when able.
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Jangchub said:

I'm not anywhere near Riverside, WA, but perhaps I can be of some use...
Corydalis lutea is the longest flowering perennial I have in my garden. I can have blooms from early spring into late October.
It is short lived but reseeds and grows in spots that vary from some sun to mostly shaded. It even grows where it has to put up with a burst of sun in mid-day, which is rather impressive.
In my yard, it grows where other shade plants (like Pulmonaria) have regularly died due to water stress, but it probably will need *some* supplemental water.
I also have some Geranium macrorrhizum that puts up with fairly dry shade.They have a very short bloom period but have (in my opinion) pleasantly scented foliage that (unlike some Geranium species) never needs to be fussed with and sheared back.
The one other plant I have that does well in the drier shady corners is Epimedium x versicolor 'Sulphureum'. Short but very showy bloom period in the spring. The young leaves are also attractively colored. This plant is most attractive if you shear off the old foliage (which is semi-evergreen) in late winter/very early spring, just before the flower stems start to emerge. (I have another Epimedium with far less showy flowers but it is just as tough.)
--
Pat in Plymouth MI

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Jangchub said:

Tiarella should go to zone 3, but my experience is it struggles when the shade is dry and (though I haven't grown it myself) Cimicifuga also likes moister conditions.
I've been thinking, though, and recalled that my sister-in-law in Nebraska (two zones colder and much drier than my lgarden) has Campanula glomerata blooming in a part-shade spot. (And I grow several different species/varieties of Campanula in partly shaded spots.)
She also grows Callirhoe involucrata (Wine Cups aka Purple Poppy Mallow) in sun to part shade areas. They are late spring/summer bloomers. Very attractive low, creeping plants. (I ought to ask her for some seeds.)

Heh. It may stay (barely) above freezing for 24 hours on Saturday. I think we've been above freezing at all maybe three or four times since Christmas. (It's been colder than usual this winter.) On the other hand, I rather like having the winter 'down time.' Just don't appreciate the way the wind can cut right through you sometimes. (Like last night, walking to and from the car when my daughter and I went to our Japanese culture class.)
--
Pat in Plymouth MI

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