Any solution for live oaks sprouting up?

Recently moved into a new neighborhood in the Berkeley Hills. There isn't another California coast live oak for at least half a block, so they must be transported by more than just gravity or wind. A neighbor walking by saw me pulling a few and commented that sometimes birds drop them. I think maybe squirrels might be redistributing them. I found one under my deck (growing between a concrete tile crack), which doesn't have any reasonable path for an acorn to travel unless it was moved there. I'm pretty sure they're sprouting from the acorns, as the few I've pulled usually have the shell of the acorn attached to the root.
Not sure what to do other than pull them. I tried using 1% Roundup from a spray bottle, but they seem resistant. I wasn't sure if maybe the leaves had to be cut to improve absorption. Once I visited a local botanical garden, and chatted with some of the gardening crew. They commented that live oak acorns distribute everywhere, and lots of their time is spent pulling saplings from the garden. I sometimes hike on trails where the acorns are just everywhere.
We've been having a certain problem in Berkeley with a few planted live oaks that are planned for removal on University of California property.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Who told you to dilute glysophate to 1%? DID YOU READ THE LABEL? If you did, you'd see that in order to work the foliage should be lush as glyphosate is a systemic herbicide. Stop being lazy and just pull the things up. How many could you possibly have...?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Whoa - what's with the harsh words? I know what it does. I've used it in the past to kill poison oak growing in my folks' backyard. In any case, I've read the label on the concentrated versions that says that lower concentrations can be used for certain weeds.
I didn't have the bottle in my hand and was briefly looking up information before I posted. I got confused because I saw the listing for Roundup Poison Ivy & Tough Brush Killer which is 0.1% triclopyr and 1% glyphosate. I'd rather not use that since I know triclopyr is more persistent and toxic.
The bottle I used was actually 24oz "Ready to Use", which I understand is 2% glyphosate. I've been using it on all the weeds that grow in the cracks as well as assorted stuff that sprouts up everywhere.
I've got dozens of the suckers all over the front and back yards. I've got a strip along the side where they've sprouted up around ivy. I even saw one that came out in a group of tightly packed succulents.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

In your post you said you didn't know if the "leaves had to be cut to improve absorpion." That would indicate to me that you didn't know how to use the product. Not harsh words, just frustrated with people spraying everything to death to the point where we won't have any water untainted left. I'm frustrated because people do not follow the label.

Just pull them out. You cannot use glysophate on ivy or succulents. Glysophate is indiscriminate. It generally kills everything except nutsedge and possibly one or two other common weeds. If you don't want to pull them out, get a colinear hoe and just cut them at the soil level. Voila.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No - I couldn't find anything specifically on the use of herbicides for oaks. I did a small amount of research on the use of Roundup, and in it I read some brush the concentrated version directly into split branches for some resistant plants. I know the most common method is as a diluted systemic herbicide with primary absorption through leaves and no activity through roots or bark. I wasn't sure about the live oaks, whether I sprayed at the wrong time or whether or not the (rather shiny) leaves would be resistant to absorption.
Mostly I've been using it for the weeds that develop in cracks on my driveway or concrete/brick. I've known from experience that many weeds will regrow if the roots aren't killed and part of the root breaks off.

Well - I have been using them on some stray ivy that's been shooting through. Not sure how they got where they did, as I don't think the root system is going to transport it 4 yards away. In any case, spraying 3 leaves isn't likely to kill a larger ivy network, but I think it might get those leaves. And I did pull out the live oak sprouting near the ivy and other plants I wanted to keep.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

Last year was a banner year for oaks in Sonoma county. The acorns were the size of walnuts and when they bounced off our roof they became dangerous. They would ricochet three or four times before they came to rest. They are coming up in my yard in a profusion that I haven't seen before, and I have been here 37 years. I have been pulling them up and they just keep on coming. Eventually I'll win, but they are really very insistent this year.
--

Billy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KVTfcAyYGg&ref=patrick.net

  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.sacbee.com/378/story/830070.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I found a pair of pliers very helpful with yanking up saplings. I think you're right about the squirrels.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've got a wooden set of pliers with metal grasping support. It is about 3 feet tall light and pulls stuff without bending over. I looked about but it seems to be no longer available. This was from Smith & Hawkins 25 years ago. Perhaps a call for potential out of stock items.
Bill
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.