Another English Ivy Question

I have english ivy growing up a dead tree stump and on the ground around the stump. It's been growing so long that I now have two-foot-long branches (is that what you call them) growing out from the tree stump, attached to nothing. I'd like to "harvest" these branches, root them somehow, and plant them in the areas that are bare. Can anyone here give me some advice on the best way to do that?
I know I can get root growth simply by cutting pieces off and putting them in water. Is this the best way?
How long should the roots be before I replant? Should I replant in the ground or in a pot first?
When should I do all of this? Now? Cut and root now and replant ASAP? Cut and root now and replant in the spring? Or just wait and do it all in the spring?
I'm in central Texas, west of Waco.
Thanks in advance for your help,
8^)~~~ Sue (remove the x to e-mail) ~~~~~~
"I reserve the absolute right to be smarter today than I was yesterday." -Adlai Stevenson ************************************************* http://www.suzanne-eckhardt.com / http://www.intergnat.com/malebashing /
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I have successfully propagated English ivy simply buy cutting off pieces and sticking them in the ground. I keep them moist for a couple of weeks. II would use some of the end pieces with new, small diameter stems, not the very old, think stuff. it's nearly foolproof.
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This summer I vacationed my cactus on our sunny porch for the first time. The plant had blossomed a couple of times in the previous year. The leaves have turned a deep crimson and it does not look happy. It is indoors for the winter months. I have repotted it and cut back the stalks. Will it survive or have I killed it?
Don Whalen, Zone 6b, in the Roanoke Valley of Southwestern Virginia.
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On Sat, 22 Nov 2003 06:33:24 -0500, "Donald R. Whalen"

It is better to transplant/prune Zygocactus at the beginning of the growing season, in spring. Overwatering can kill it, especially during the winter. For winter wait until you see a little shriveling on a leaf to give it a drink.
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First of all, the plant has absolutely no leaves. Those are flattened stem joints. Secondly, how would you know if a plant looks happy anyway? You should have asked what to do before you over-reacted like some flighty school girl.
The stems of Schlumbergera will take on a reddish hue in bright light or in cool temperatures. Unless they are shriveled, turning brown or disarticulating, you have nothing to worry about.
You should have left the plant alone. The plant is self-pruning and any damaged stems segments will fall away on their own. You may not have damaged the plant but it probably will not bloom now because you removed all the new growth that would have produced flower buds.
Repotting it when bringing it indoors was not a very bright thing to do either. You just may have created the perfect conditions for root rot.
Why in the heck are you cross-posting to austin.gardening if you live in Virginia?

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On Sat, 22 Nov 2003 06:33:24 -0500, "Donald R. Whalen"

those "leaves" are flattned stems. if you did not throw them out, you can root them. i do not think all is lost, even if the plant shows some signs of distress, i think some tender care will put things to rights. i would keep it moderately well lit, and watered cautiously until it shows signs of renewed life. i have been able in the past to root really withered abused cuttings from these plants. in other words, do not despair, all is not lost. hermine
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The English Ivy that ate my back yard and half the neighbor's yard started as a little brown stick my dad thought was dead and threw in a very shady corner in the back yard. Unfortunately right by the power line pole. It is a nice shady and damp area. English Ivy will grow anywhere, usually where you don't want it in my experience, even when you think it's dead.
Shell

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I had a small blue spruce topiary growing in a large pot with some English ivy at the base. The spruce needed to be transplanted because it outgrew the container. I removed all the ivy I could, hacking it down to the roots. Six months later, I found it growing in the area where I transplanted the spruce. I had been checking all summer to make sure I got it all. It's very hearty stuff!!!
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It sure is. What we threw away was a brown twig with no leaves and about 2 inches long. We had to hire some people three times to get it cut back and there are still patches of the ivy all along the fence line just waiting for the new fence to be put up :)
Shell

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