Amaryllis bulbs, bulblets and fertilizer

Hi folks,
I hope someone out there has some suggestions.
I have some Amaryllis plants that I am trying to keep flowering and some Amaryllis 'youngsters' that I started from seed about 5 years ago.
One of the adults has produced bublets that are now producing bulblets themselves, but no blooms. One of my 'younsters' has even produced a bulblet without ever flowering.
I have been using a 10-15-10 fertilizer.
Any suggestions on how to encourage to bulb to grow instead of producing bulblets?
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Java wrote:

Are these Amaryllis belladonna or are these Hippeastrum (commonly called amaryllis)? See my <http://www.rossde.com/garden/garden_hippeastrum.html for an explanation of the difference.
If these are Amaryllis belladonna, disturbing the roots at the wrong time of the year (e.g., by dividing bulbs or repotting) can stop them from blooming for several years. Hippeastrum do not have this problem.
For either Amaryllis or Hippeastrum, overfeeding can suppress blooming. Another cause of non-blooming can be too much shade.
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David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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I really do not know if they are A. belladonna or Hippeastrum. I am guessing Hippeastrum since they were sold under the name of Amaryllis, not Naked Lady.
My adult plants (those I bought) are all producing blooms. However, one has started producing a small flower along with bulblets.
I really do not know what I am doing with the bulblets or seedlings. I accidentally pollinated one of the plants so I thought it would be worth the experiment.
The bulblets and seedlings are not really large enough to produce good blooms. What could be causing a few of them to be producing bulblets themselves instead of making a larger bulb? What encourages good bulb growth?
David E. Ross wrote:

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Java wrote:

Bulb growth (and flowering, fruiting, and root growth) is promoted by phosphorus. For a potted plant, use a tablespoon of bone meal for any pot upto 12 inches. Superphosphate is likely to be too strong for the confined roots in a flowerpot; I use superphosphate freely for plants in the ground.
Unlike most other nutrients, phosphorus does not dissolve and travel through the soil. It must already be where roots will find it. Thus, it must be thoroughly mixed with the potting soil before you plant the bulb. For an existing potted plant, add the bone meal when you repot. For existing plants in the ground, I use a 2-foot length of rebar to drive holes in the soil, which I then fill with superphosephate.
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David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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Cut off the bulblets as soon as they form.

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