Ailing Roses

I don't know much about roses, so when my friends sent me some pictures of their ailing roses, I wasn't sure how to advise them. Perhaps some of the rose gurus could take a peek at the following photos and tell me what's going on with these roses? They just planted them in a new garden bed about a week or so ago. What might be causing them to brown at the tips and look so sad? See them at:
http://tinyurl.com/br6k8
Thanks.
-Fleemo
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That looks like the way rose blossoms NORMALLY fade as they age. Hasn't anyone ever given these people a bouquet of roses? :-) If your friend just planted them a week ago, that means those buds were either open when they bought them, or on their way to it. They have to provide some pretty awful planting conditions in order for some external factor to hammer the plants that bad, and that quickly.
Tell them to deadhead (remove spent flowers). Looking down from each flower, find the first branch with 5 leaves, and snip about 1/4" above that spot. Then, be patient.

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Ya know Doug, that thought entered my mind. But when I saw the browning edges on the new rose bud, I thought there might be a problem here after all. I'll suggest they prune the roses as you outlined and keep an eye on them.
Thanks.
-Fleemo
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On Mon, 23 May 2005 11:11:36 -0700, fleemo17 wrote:

Good day fleemo. For what ever reason, tinyurl's almost _never_ work when I click them. The links always time out or have a broken host. Dunno what that's about, but from the sounds of it, your friends' rose maybe affected by botrytis. Botrytis is a fungus and it's very likly it got it from the nursery outlet. It's almost for sure that the nursery got these shipped in bulk to them, packed on pallets in a truck. If one had it ... many of them could be infected. Either way, have your friends look at and read this page: http://pep.wsu.edu/hortsense/scripts/query/displayProblem.asp?tableName=plant&problemIDT7&categoryID=1
Yep, that's a huge url, so goto: http://pep.wsu.edu/hortsense /
click on: Ornamentals > Rose > Botrytis bud and twig blight
Have take a look and see what they think. Good luck.
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Without knowing how old the blossoms were, that's quite a conclusion. Don't flowers ever fade on your planet? :-)
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On Tue, 24 May 2005 04:04:16 +0000, Doug Kanter wrote:

Yes flowers do fade on my planet.... does botrytis exist on yours..? All that I'm doing is giving the poster an option to what could be causing the issue, due to the photos being unavailable to me to inspect. One would assume that between the poster and his friend, they would be able to recognize a wilted flower. Again an assumption was made and an option was given.
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OK...it could be botrytis. But, I was providing one answer which is guaranteed to be accurate 100% of the time: Flowers fade. I think it's going to be especially true with a plant that's been living in a cardboard box. So, I'd say, wait and see what happens for a month or two before assuming there's a disease, and running out to buy all sorts of obnoxious chemicals.
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Gentlemen, thank you both for taking the time to offer advice. I truly appreciate it.
Timothy, thanks for the URL to the botrytis page. The photo they have of the rose looks much more diseased than the photos my friend sent me. (By the way, here's the standard URL to the site: http://www.sunriveronline.org/misc/roses )
It could very well be a simple case of faded flowers. As I said, I don't know anything about roses, and when I saw the new rose bud turning brown, I thought there might be something more sinister involved. But I'll advise them to keep an eye on them.
I did pass along Doug's excellent advice on the five-leaf pruning method, so even if it is a simple case of fading flowers, we learned something in the process. :)
All the best to you both.
-Fleemo
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On Tue, 24 May 2005 10:35:13 -0700, fleemo17 wrote:

Thanks for the direct link to the photos. The second photo from the top looks like a good candidate for botrytis in the early stages. Compare for yourself here: http://www.sactorose.org/rosebug/irosepests.htm#BOTRYTIS%20BLIGHT
The other most common issue with rose blooms turning brown would be thrips. Thrips feed on the open buds and cause brown edges on the petals.
Yet another simple explaination could be that they got hosed down and were transported wet and the blooms that were already set started to rot.
My suggestion would be to remove all distorted/affested buds and flowers. Wait untill the next flowering and see if the problem continues. If so, inspect the the flowers and buds very well ,ripping the flowers apart to see if thrips are living in there. If no thrips are present, then strat thinking about botrytis. Good luck.
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inspect the the flowers and buds very well ,ripping the flowers apart to see if thrips are living in there. If no thrips are present, then strat
thinking about botrytis. Good luck.<
Good advice. I will pass that on. And thanks again! :)
-F
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On Tue, 24 May 2005 17:15:21 +0000, Doug Kanter wrote:
<edit>

Nor did I make any recommendations either, just offering an option. Flower fade (imho) would imply a natural process of decay, not decay instagated by disease. If the flowers are browning off along with the new buds then botrytis would be the proper diagnosis. These roses are just as likely to have gotten botrytis during shipping as "flower fade" if they were shipped in a cool, damp truck or stored in a damp cold frame.
In short, I never suggested or recommended the use of "obnoxious chemicals" nor did I ever suggest that it was for sure botrytis. Please reffer to the word "maybe" in my original post and if you followed the link you would see that there are other options there on diseases and non-chemical cures. Glad we could clear that up....... have a good day.
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