Agway fertilizer and Scotts broadcast spreader - what setting???

I bought a big bag of Agway Organic lawn fertilizer and bought a Scotts Standard Broadcast Spreader. On the back of the bag they list the settings for every brand of spreader except Scotts. Does anyone know how I can find out the proper setting for this fertilizer using the Scotts spreader?
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Usually the settings are 1-5, find a listing for a similar type spreader on the bag, and match it up to what % opening the spreader is. Then match that up with your spreader.
It's not an exact science. Even with the same setting 2 different people will get 2 different coverage rates, based on the speed at which they walk. I usually start with the smallest or second smallest setting, then see if it works for me, no matter what the bag recommends.
-S
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Thanks, another thing that I've been reading online is that this Scotts spreader doesn't have a hole big enough to accomodate some lime pellet products. I probably won't be using any Scotts products, would I be better off bringing this one back and buying a generic spreader? Is Scotts the "Betamax" of lawn care products? Do they make it so if you buy their spreader you need to buy their products as well?
Snooze wrote:

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Scotts spreaders are designed to evenly spread uniformly sized fertilizer granules, if you're going to use a product with larger pellets, I can see the pellets getting clogged in the hopper or not coming out at the ideal rate.
Most big box stores have a fairly liberal return policy, try it out, if the flow rate is weak, just make 2 passes. If it gets clogged, return it for something with a larger orifice.
-S
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Options:
1) Try contacting Agway to see what setting they recommend.
2) Return the fertilizer and buy some Scotts fertilizer. It is pretty reasonably priced in large bags at Sam's Club, Costco, BJ's, etc.
It is extremely difficult to go wrong with both Scotts fertilizer and a good Scotts spreader. Don't buy any Scotts fertilizer which has been manufactured to be sold under some second party's (retailer's) house label. Those are often inferior non-complex fertilizers similar to the bargain brands. Much more preferable are the fertilizers which are uniformly blended before the prilling process, producing those nice uniform pellets of fertilizer. The multi-sized, multi-colored prills of the less expensive bags generally do not get spread as uniformly as the blended prills.
To the best of my knowledge, Scotts standard lines of fertilizers are always uniformly blended prills. Their secondary market of house brand fertilizers aren't. When you observe a bag of fertilizer which has multi-sized prills and/or multi-colored prills, you are observing a product which was manufactured cheaply.
Scotts appears to have done consider R&D in determining how to produce fertilizers which spread uniformly, release slowly, and release uniformly. Which is why they have that famous "no quibble" guarantee.
Also, Scotts (and their Ortho division) have pretty good toll-free telephone support and advise. My only complain in that area is the fact that some customer support folks are obvious not super astute and are reading from scripts, checking manuals, or doing computer searches to answer questions for which they have little knowledge base. That's when I hang up and try another day, hoping to get one of the more experienced staff who really knows his stuff.
I have no connect with Scotts and I'm not shilling for them. I'm just passing on my observations and learning experience from decades of trying various products and ultimately deciding upon Scotts. I got tired of trying less expensive products which didn't perform well. Or products for which I had to guess spreader settings.
If you are fertilizing a lawn yourself, then you are saving a tremendous amount of money versus having a lawn service do the fertilizing. When you are saving a few hundred dollars, why try to cheap out and save an extra few bucks buying the bargain products?
Now, if only Scotts could start once again producing a broadleaf weed killer which works well. I'm no longer pleased with the their weedkillers under either their Scotts label or their Ortho label.
Gideon
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[snip]

Except see, the fertilizer the original poster was attempting to use organic, rather then synthetic. If the original poster had asked, "how do i use scotts fertilizer in a scott's spreader" then you're post would be useful, except then the answer would be painfully obvious.
-S
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Snooze wrote with fractured grammar: Except see, the fertilizer the original poster was attempting to use organic, rather then synthetic.
Ann wrote: Except the OP is using an organic fertilizer. I won't use anything but Espoma Organic lawn food, no more excessive growth and I have a wonderfully strong, green lawn with two applications a year.
========= Yes. So please note the very first piece of advice that I offered to the original poster:
Options: 1) Try contacting Agway to see what setting they recommend.
If the original poster is 100% convinced that the world as we know it will end if anything other than organic fertilizer is used, then he is free to ignore much of the rest of my post. But, I have "converted" many folks to switch from organic to the much more reliable and easy Scotts. Ground water is still fine, the children don't have extra extremities, the wildlife is thriving fine, and the predicted end of the world hasn't arrived. :)
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And I have converted many more to organic, because of the lack of growth spurt (and all the subsequent mowing), the wonderful green and abundant root growth provided by the totally reliable organic fertilizer I use only twice a year, no four-step program necessary. All that wonderful grass growth without the chemicals to worry about at all. Why switch to Scotts? Oh, that's right, we're growing sharholders here, not grass.
You rather remind me of John Riley from Oz who was an ardent defender of anything chemical.
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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Ann wrote
You rather remind me of John Riley from Oz who was an ardent defender of anything chemical.
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
================ You remind me of millions of people with grade school level science knowledge who don't realize that our entire planet is "chemical."
Gideon, sentient in Zone 1a
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Ann ranted:
And I have converted many more to organic, because of the lack of growth spurt (and all the subsequent mowing), the wonderful green and abundant root growth provided by the totally reliable organic fertilizer I use only twice a year, no four-step program necessary. All that wonderful grass growth without the chemicals to worry about at all. Why switch to Scotts? Oh, that's right, we're growing sharholders here, not grass.
You rather remind me of John Riley from Oz who was an ardent defender of anything chemical.
============== Opinionated much, Ann?
If you are getting big growth spurts with Scotts fertilizer and a well calibrated Scotts spreader, then you aren't very astute. I currently use Scotts twice per year and I am extremely happy with the cost and the results. If you don't like it, then fine. One of the advantages of living in the Free World is the fact that we are pretty much free to do as we please, and we are free to offer more than one solution to a question. Which I did. Which you don't.
You can't get good results with Scotts? Maybe you aren't quite as bright as you think you are.
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Oh, and you're not? Not insulting either, are you. Whatever. Stew in your chemical soup.
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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Except the OP is using an organic fertilizer. I won't use anything but Espoma Organic lawn food, no more excessive growth and I have a wonderfully strong, green lawn with two applications a year.
I use the 7 setting on my Scotts Acccugreen drop spreader, but the OP really should contact Agway for the proper setting.
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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