Aconite - Snow Drops didn't come up

I planted some Aconite bulbs last September and nothing has come up yet here in central PA. The crocuses have been up for 10 days or so already, and I thought there would at least be some green tips showing from the Aconite.
The bulbs were purchased in late August and given to me. They were a commercial product in a bag, but I'm wondering if they were old stock. The bulbs were somewhat wrinkled like large hard raisins, unlike the smooth bulbs of a crocus or daffodil.. Is that how Aconite bulbs are supposed to look or were they dried out and left over stock from the previous season?
It wasn't convenient to dig a trench around the tree where they were planted, so I pounded a bar slightly larger than the bulbs into the soil to make each hole, dropped each bulb in its hole and then poured water down / over the holes to seal them / loosen the soil, then covered the holes back up with mulch. This method has worked for me in the past with daffodils and crocuses, so I assumed it would work with the Snowdrops. They were planted about 2-3" deep.
I doubt that squirrels got them, since we don't have any bold enough to venture to the front yard (it's a long way from their natural habitat over open ground) and the mulch wasn't disturbed.
RWL
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Well, first of all, Aconite is usually not given the name of snowdrops - because the flowers are yellow, not white. Galanthus is the species usually called snow drops. I believe that aconite is a corm - somewhat bulb-like, but different - gladiolus is also a corm, as is crocus. Some corms benefit from a brief soaking before planting - especially if the ground is somewhat dry. This is often recommended for Anemones for instance. I think this might be possible for aconite as well - but it wouldn't be recommended for crocus, which seem to always do fine planted "as is". Perhaps your aconites were a little "moisture-deprived" in the bag and failed for that reason. Sometimes mine have put up leaves without flowering. Look for some very finely divided leaves in the vicinity of where you planted them, just in case they came up without flowering. If you did mean galanthus, snow drops, they seem to fail often from fall planting, and I have seen it recommended to move them just as the foliage yellows and withers in the spring.

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Both Aconite tubers and Snowdrop bulbs very much dislike planting dry. For best results they are moved 'in the green' and then carry on as if untouched. Yours might very well have taken a season off. Don't despair. Aconite can become most invasive and is my most prominent lawn weed. Best Wishes

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