Acer Platanoides Red Leafed Norway Maple

Hi,
We've recently just planted an Acer Platanoides Red Leafed Norway Mapl in our garden.
I went to water it the other day and give a look over when i notice that quite a few of the leaves had holes in them and have been eaten.
At first i thought it could be slugs as we have a lot of them aroun these parts - then i had another look today and noticed a lot of gree mites.I'm not sure what they are,whether they are greenfly or not ?
Does anybody have any ideas of what they are and how to get rid of the please,they're making a right mess of our lovely tree
-- renny07
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wrote:

Could be aphids. Usually preditors will discover and eat them, but you can also spray, Sevin usually works well and is relatively safe as insecticides go. You can also spray the entire tree and drench the soil around the tree with a mixture; 1 quart water : 1 Tbls Murphy's Oil Soap.
The tree you describe is properly called "Crimson King" Norway maple. I planted one two years ago to replace the one that was much too large and and much too near my house, so had it removed. The last owners planted it more than 45 years ago, but only ten feet from the house. These trees grow very large and this one became a monster.... I hated to have it removed but it was ruining my roof, and deck, and all I saw out my windows was a wall of deep magenta. Needless to say I planted the new one a good hundred feet away. I hope yours has lots of room to grow... this tree gets tremendous; can easily surpass 100 feet tall and 100 feet wide. If you have any reservations about it's location move it now.
This is the one I had removed:
http://i19.tinypic.com/4lerk11.jpg
I hated to do it but it couldn't stay there and couldn't be moved.
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you planted a Norway maple *on purpose*? why on earth would you replace a weed tree with another weed tree? why not with a red maple, a sugar maple, a beech or some tree with actual value? fortunately my state has wised up and banned the sale & intentional propagation of Norway maples. more places should follow suit. lee
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Uh, the original poster, if I'm guessing right from the address, was in *Europe*. At least in parts thereof, the Norway maple is native. See map at
http://linnaeus.nrm.se/flora/di/acera/acer/acerplav.jpg (I don't know if the UK is considered a problem or not for growing this tree).
Agreed that I would not recommend planting a Norway maple in the United States (at least not in the mid-atlantic region where it has escaped cultivation and now lives in wild areas: http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/pubs/midatlantic/acpl.htm although I'm not sure that advice applies to all areas).

Please, say which state. Location does matter in these things.
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The site you're refering to is inaccurate, the red leafed tree in that photo is not a Norway maple, true Norway maple is not red leafed nor is it singularly trunked nor is it any more invasive than red maple or sugar maple, probably much less so due to its inability to reach above the forest canapy for light because of it's lateral spreading growing habit. That may be the crimson king version they're depicting, which is in no way invasive. Actually the various japanese maples are the most invasive of the maples, especially within the perimeters of forests as they prefer low light environs.
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It's sycamores (Acer pseudoplatanus) that are a problem in the UK (but they still get Tree Preservation Orders stuck on them). I wouldn't be surprised to find Acer platanoides becoming a problem; the one down the street from me produce plenty of seedlings.
For amenity value I think I'd prefer a Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum), but I reckon that a Norway Maple in flower is quite attractive. (I don't care for the dark-leaved "black" cultivars.)

--
Stewart Robert Hinsley

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in

I have a red maple, a few in fact, lots of sugar maples, and I recently planted a 4" caliper American beech. Sugar maple and red maple are not very valuable, in fact they are the least costly of the maples found at plant nurseries. Beech trees are nice but not very valuable... I recently planted a weeping copper leafed beech.

You obviously haven't a clue about maple trees, and the various Norway maples specifically. The Crimson King is a very valuable specimen tree, the true Norway maple is a very large multi trunked tree and a mature nicely formed specimen is extremely valuable (I have one of those, a very large and beautiful one. I have some young ones too). Perhaps you're confusing the Norway maples with the silver maple, that's the only popular maple tree that deserves to be banned, but only within city limits as they are very weak wooded and cause much peripheral damage during inclement weather, but make very fine habitat trees (critters love that they drop branches). You must live in a state of confusion.
This is a true Norway maple, a wonderful shade tree and kids love it for climbing, many have admired it:
http://i16.tinypic.com/4xqhcsk.jpg
My new weeping copper leafed beech... beech are very slow growing, we'll all be long gone before this is a real tree:
http://i2.tinypic.com/4zabvc7.jpg
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No, you obviously don't have a clue. But what's new?

Norway Maples are not multitrunked.

Of course you have young ones. They're invasive as hell. They're driving the native red maples (which aren't red, by the way, but you haven't a clue about them, either. Acer rubrum. Look it up).

It may be weak branched, but it's native. The Norway Maple isn't. The Norway Maple is invasive http://www.earthworksboston.org/articles/UWnorway.htm , http://www.invasive.org/eastern/species/3002.html , and banned in Massachusetts and New Hampshire and the status is pending in the other New England states.
I see plenty of silver maples (Acer saccharinum) in my area and they're all tall, strong trees that rarely drop branches. The tree in front of my mother's house is over 250 years old and still standing nicely. I understand in other parts of the country they don't do as well, especially in the warmer states. Don't grow them there.
There is a hybrid between the silver and the red maple, Acer x freemanii, that is a better landscape tree than the Norway in that it doesn't drop non-native seeds everywhere. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver_Maple
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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i think you are confusing price with value there. a red or sugar maple is far more valuable for lumber, for firewood & for syrup (red maples do produce sap with enough brix to make decent syrup) than a Norway. Norways are not even particularly good firewood, and make far too dense shade to be good landscape trees. they suck water. they spread seeds far & wide. they crossbreed with sugar maple, producing an even more useless tree... beech are a very valuable food source for wild turkey & deer (and humans).

no. i know far more about trees & wildlife habitat than you... but we've been over this before. you're still in denial that i'm a maple syrup producer.
the state of NH has indeed placed the Norway maple on the invasive species list & banned the sale & propagation of them in the state. i'm quite pleased about this, because the stupid things are the bane of a sugarbush.
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Not a serious issue this phenological stage.
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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renny07;743334 Wrote:

it! Every spring it promised much and by the end of July it looke pretty sick!
At the same time I also planted an Acer platinoides 'Drummondii' - th one with the creamy-margined leaves - and I can't sing its praises to highly! Hope this helps
-- Winsford
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