Acacia or Locust

Hi -- Is there an easy way for a beginner gardener to identify an acacia seedling? I've read that both Black locust and Honey locust have thorns or spines and bipinnately compound leaves. Since Acacia dealbata seems to have both of these features how can you tell which is which if you have an immatute 1 foot plant? TIA
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told2b wrote:

Wait until it's big enough to cut a twig with at least two leaves and some thorns. Take the twig to a local college and ask someone in the botony or horticulture department. That's what I did to identify a Zelkova serrata tree.
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David E. Ross
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of small shrubby like trees along our shared driveway. This year, she has pointed out that there is a seedling ACROSS the driveway from the line of trees that are "walking" eastwards along the side of the gravel and ridge of our driveway. The seedling in question she wants me to dig up is two foot tall, the upright, suckering shrub has bristly shoots and pinnate, dark green leaves (12 inches) long, composed of 9-13 ovate to broadly elliptic leaflets.
The proper name so you can look it up is Robinia (Fabaceae) hispida. the common names are rose acacia, bristly locust. It will get between six foot to ten foot tlal, hardy from zones 5-8, originates from the southeastern part of the US, likes sun or light shade (Miz Mary's all face Southwards with western exposure, well actually hers get ALL exposures). It likes well drained soil (LOVES the shoulder of the gravel driveway, but is doing just fine with the clay soil as it suckers along the drive). And it's growth rate is rather fast.
Acacia dealbata is an open, evergreen tree with fern-like 2-pinnate, hairy leaves, 5 inches long. Each with 40-80 linear, glaucous to silvery leaflets. Terminal racemes, 4-8 inches long, of spherical, fragrant yellow flowerheads, 1/4 inch across and are borne from winter to spring, from New South Wales to Tasmania, zones 9-10.
now which is it? Pink rose acacia, or the silver mimosa tree?
hope these descriptions help. (by the way, if I want to lift the seedling shoot of the Robinia hispida or pink bristly locust, I have to sever the roots and leave the sapling for a bit while it callouses and grows from it's mother shoot. Once I do that, it will lift. I've tried to dig up about five of these saplings that pop up down from the original clump and they don't transplant. Just only recently discovered you have to do this first.
The common Robinia pseudo-acacia (black locust) has blue-green foliage and more handsome. The prominent bristles on the branches and leaf petioles account for the common name bristly locust, and spines on the bark and stems, twigs and branches of the honey locust. Once established, the honey locust also has another name......iron wood tree. (a most loved home of the very proliferous flying squirrel that we have here, I have some in a hollow trunk of an old honey locust tree on the east side of my house near the first drop off terrace into my woods)
The pink acacia fixes nitrogen since it's actually a kissing cousin of the pea family. I adore the wisteria like clusters of flowers in the late spring. And this year with the cooler spells we had, Miz Mary's shrubby trees bloomed again a bit lesser, but had some pink flowers nevertheless.
I do hope this helps. madgardener up on the ridge, back in Fairy Holler, overlooking English Mountain in Eastern Tennessee..zone 7, Sunset zone 36 where I'll try one more time to lift some of Miz Mary's pink hairy locust saplings. <g>
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On Tue, 11 Oct 2005 10:05:32 -0400
] The proper name so you can look it up is Robinia (Fabaceae) hispida. the ] common names are rose acacia, bristly locust. It will get between six foot ] to ten foot tlal, hardy from zones 5-8, originates from the
These are gorgeous. Here they are all grafted either on either rootstock or whip of what we call common acacia, Robinia pseudo- acacia I suppose. We had one on haute-tige that got quite big, and then the entire grafted crown blew off the tree. Very disappointing as it would flower twice and everything. It stood as a stick for 1 year and then positively exploded with growth, an has now reformed a large crown. I'd love to try again, but perhaps I should be looking for a non-grafted specimen?
-E
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Hi Mad -- It's too dark and wet to really investigate the plant with all the info you have given me. But since the Rose-flowering Acacia is considered an invasive weed and the Silver Wattle is not, I'm willing to bet it's the Red Acacia. This plant started as a volunteer in front of my house. One of my neighboors from down the block asked me about it. He said he remembered as a boy in Italy after WWII the males in the family giving the females yellow flowers from the Acacia trees in early March. It was not just his family, everyone honored the women in town by presenting them with Acacia blooms. He said my volunteer reminded him very much of the Acacia trees from which they got the flowers. I very much wanted this to be the tree of his boyhood memories. Thank you for all the info you have supplied. madgardener wrote:

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