A Green Wall?

My neighbor recently cut down a bunch of tall trees that did a pretty good job of hiding his mess from my mess. To remedy this situation quickly, I want to do this:
1/ Sink 20' rebar into concrete-filled buckets 2/ String bird netting or deer netting between these pieces of rebar, and 3/ Grow some fast-growing climbing plants (flowering, edible or whatever) to grow up the netting and thus having a very high green wall.
This would probably need to be kept from tipping over somehow from wind, but this seems to be a minor point.
Can anyone find any faults with this project and can anyone suggest plants for this project?
Thanks
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The main fault I see is that it may be very temporary. Any food crop will complete its lifecycle and die, leaving you with the original problem. Depending on where you live, it might not meet zoning regulations. I wouldn't think that a bucket of concrete would hold a twenty food piece of rebar. When you add wind load to the equation, you will have some considerable torque to deal with. If the thing falls and injures someone or causes damage to your neighbor's property, you could be facing some big liability. If the arrangement is ridiculously unstable, you could be facing criminal negligence should someone get injured or killed.
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Vox Humana wrote:

As Vox points out, the structure falling over isn't a "minor point". It probably will fall over before the neighborhood bookie can fill-up all the slots in the betting pool. The big question would be what damage it'll do, and will someone get hurt in the process.
Also, depending on how local laws define it, this could be considered a fence, and could be subject to height restrictions. When it falls and hurts someone or something, not having the proper permits for a 20' high fence is going to add to your problems. You may find your home owner's insurance will refuse to cover your liability because the structure was built without permit.
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Warren H.

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Where do you live? How long do you plan to stay in the place?
Agree with V.H. that this may not last well. Wind is one problem, rot of the netting is another.
There may be woody plants that will grow fast enough for your needs. That could be more attractive. Whether is's feasible depends on the two questions asked.
Mike Prager Beaufort, NC (on the coast in zone 8a) (Remove spam traps from email address to reply.)
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