A few questions

First of all I need some info on clematis. A friend told me that I can propagate clematis by taking a branch and sticking it in water, and from the nodes little roots will come. Well, after 5 months of sitting in a vase, nothing has happened. I think that maybe this method doesn't work. Does someone know if it's true or if there is another method to propagate clematis.
Next, I've had several perennials that have made no attempt at blooming. Last year I had the most gorgeous lupins, showstoppers for sure. This year absolutely nothing. Then there are the coreopsis which just produce nice leaves but make no attempt to flower. Both plants get about 5-6 hrs of sun. What gives?
Lastly, am I correct in stating that there is a catnip plant and a catmint plant, both different plants?
Thanks for your response. Much appreciated.
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I've never tried to propogate clematis, but if I did, I'd use rooting hormone powder (Rootone is one brand), and place them in a sterile potting mix, either indoors or in deep shade, in a spot where they don't get drenched with rain.

Same plant, different names.
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[Message snipped for brevity]

My cats, in accordance with the neighborhood strays, respectfully disagree. They are closely related, but any feline knows that catnip is a recreational drug, whereas catmint is merely a pretty plant.
Jacqueline Carmichaels PA
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I don't know nothing about nothing, but someone did mention to me that I talked to a few weeks ago, that apple juice made some kind of flowers bloom that never bloomed before. I don't remember the source of that information but he seemed genuinely sincere. Oh, no... it was in the Garden department at Walmart... and now... if I could remember the name of the flowering plant...
Anyways... unless someone indicates in the negative... wait a couple days to see if they do... it might be worth a try.
--
Jim Carlock
http://www.911forthetruth.com /
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wrote:

Could it have been a bromeliad? Usually I read to wrap them up with an apple, never heard of using the juice.
--

- Charles
-
-does not play well with others
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fine. Sue in Mi. (zone 5)
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Clematis can be propagted by seed, cuttings and layering, but layering will provide the quickest results. Layering involves taking a low growing stem of the vine and pinning a section of it that includes a leaf node to the ground (remove the leaves at the node first). Pile soil over this portion of the stem, leaving the end of the vine free. After 6-8 weeks, roots should have grown from the node. Cut this stem away from the mother plant and carefully dig up the rooted portion with the remaining vine attached. This is your new clematis plant. Treat it the same as if it was a newly purchased vine.

Yes. Catnip is the common name of Nepeta cataria, which is specifically attracting to felines and is the dried stuff found in pet stores.. 'Catmint' is generally applied to the entire genus Nepeta, however it specifically refers to the commonly grown hybrids of N. x faassenii.
Sorry, I don't have a good answer for you about your perennials.
pam - gardengal
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