A Bit Of Clarification Requested Re Using Lime For Lawn Grass Problem, Please. And, Re Lime Usage

Hello,
Thanks for all the replies re using lime to help my moss problem on my grass.
One thing wasn't too clear though.
Will applying the lime, work mainly to help prevent new moss from forming due to the now changed ph,
Or, will it (also) help kill what's there now ?
BTW: does everyone feel that the garden store lime granules are perfectly safe to use irrespective of ph results ? Any caveats ?
Thanks, Bob
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On 4/19/2010 1:52 PM, Bob wrote:

My soil was acidic and probably still is but I have not checked pH after liming with ground limestone (calcium carbonate). It was not like moss died immediately but with time grass became predominant. Doubt you could over lime as it takes quite a bit and limestone probably takes a long time to react. I would only be concerned if using calcium hydroxide or oxide which might burn things if over applied.
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The change at the interface between the acidic soil and the limestone base will be immediate, but it will take awhile for the limestone to penetrate the soil. The process will be speeded up, if you keep the soil damp.
--
- Billy
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It'll do both.

Follow the instructions printed on the bag. I've always found with any garden chemicals/amendments several smaller applications work better than one big dump.... anytime you apply anything to your garden pretend you're salting soup for guests.
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The higher pH will discourage new growth and slow down established moss. You can use agricultural lime (a fast-acting powder) or the slow release granules. Wait 6 months, check the pH again, reapply if needed.
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Bob wrote:

Perfectly safe irrespective of pH results - no. With a little care with dose and allowing time for the stuff to act - probably quite safe. It would be possible to overdose to the point where the soil went quite alkaline and then few plants would grow but you would have to be profligate. You can get a dye indicator pH testing kit for a few dollars that is quite accurate enough for the purpose and it will do many tests. Such a thing is handy to have in the garden.
David
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You could spped things up by raking up the moss and seeding with grass seed after you have corrected to ph.
--
regards, piedmont (michael)
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Other uses In horticulture it is used for treating iron chlorosis.[3] Although not as rapid-acting as iron chelate, its effects are longer-lasting. It can be mixed with compost and dug into to the soil to create a store which can last for years.[4]
It is also used as a lawn conditioner,[4]
and moss killer. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron(II)_sulfate
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