31,000 year old flower

This is from Science News on-line, April 7.
The bloom isn't off this ancient plant Fruit preserved more than 30,000 years in Siberias permafrost yields a living flower By Devin Powell April 7th, 2012; Vol.181 #7 (p. 15)
SLEEPING BEAUTYScientists grew this flowering plant from bits of a fruit preserved in Siberian permafrost for more than 31,000 years.PNAS
A flower that last bloomed while mammoths walked the Earth has been reborn, regenerated from a piece of fruit frozen in Siberian permafrost.
[read the rest at Science News On-line, April 7, titled "The bloom isn't off this ancient plant".
Gave me the chills to see picture of this beautiful flower and realize when it last bloomed...
HB
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On Thu, 17 May 2012 16:43:26 -0700 (PDT), Higgs Boson

This is a very interesting article. I would have liked to know a bit more about the process used to grow the plant from tissue. Cloning basics, I assume.
I am always amazed at the resiliency of some things I can get to grow. I am notorious for placing almost any type of seed I see into a pot of dirt, then standing back and watching. I have some wonderful patio plants for my efforts, too.
A year ago I had brunch at the Cosmopolitan in Las Vegas and there were dried dates on my fruit plate. I saved the seeds. I have a date palm growing. 10 Days ago, I found a forgotten cache of 8 varieties of tomato seeds dated 2003 and decided to throw caution to the wind and direct sow them in a bed, putting more seed per hole than I usually would. Damn near all of them are coming up. I will have to do some serious thinning.
These instances are not stretching botanical behavior too much, but it is always fun getting things to sprout. I love to nurture volunteers that show up in the garden, too.
Now I must seek out something over 30,000 years old to play with.
Boron
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Here is the website: www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/338619/title/The_bloom_isnt_off_this_ancient_plant
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wrote:

Thank you, yes...I regularly read SN, but there was little detail in the article about the initial growing.
Boron
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There is a little more info on the process in this article from Discover Magazine:
http://tinyurl.com/6mmuzz8
HB
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On Sat, 19 May 2012 10:31:45 -0700 (PDT), Higgs Boson

Perfect. Those are the basics I wanted. Thanks.
Boron
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In article

<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plant_tissue_culture> The composition of the medium, particularly the plant hormones and the nitrogen source (nitrate versus ammonium salts or amino acids) have profound effects on the morphology of the tissues that grow from the initial explant. For example, an excess of auxin will often result in a proliferation of roots, while an excess of cytokinin may yield shoots. A balance of both auxin and cytokinin will often produce an unorganised growth of cells, or callus, but the morphology of the outgrowth will depend on the plant species as well as the medium composition. As cultures grow, pieces are typically sliced off and transferred to new media (subcultured) to allow for growth or to alter the morphology of the culture. The skill and experience of the tissue culturist are important in judging which pieces to culture and which to discard. (cont.)
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Billy said

Yea, and insure another 4 years of this socialist asswipe.
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Higgs Boson wrote:

:)
it would really be interesting to compare its genetics against one that has been blooming all along (to compare the rate of mutations, because that is a measurement commonly used in other calculations).
songbird
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