zucchini blossoms

There was a discussion a while back about zucchini with blossoms all of one sex or another. Most people complained that they had too many male blossoms (apparently they come out first). I had the opposite problem, almost no male blossoms at all.
My problem was with "Raven" variety, and I won't plant it again.
So ...
How about some discussion on which varieties have the most balanced blooms and are therefore the most productive?
Please mention your location/zone when replying - thanks.
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry, Male blossoms from any other squash or pumpkin near by should provide pollen for you Raven zucchini. Was the Raven the only squash you grew this year?
Steve in the Adirondacks
Larry Blanchard wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

I had 3 squash plants in the spots vacated by salad stuff as the weather warmed up (in Spokane WA Zone 5).
Another poster says no problem with Raven. Something strange in (or not in) my soil? I've grown yellow summer squash in previous years and had no problems.
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah that was me. Ravens were our only squash until late august when we planted the tromboncinos.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oh I forgot to mention, I think it's possible that you have a pollination problem. Have you been using any pesticides, like Sevin, that kill bees and other pollinators?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article <phaedrine_stonebridge-10CCFF.09064612102003@news-

each plant over the entire summer! That's NOT a pollination problem :-).
And as for pollinators, there are times you couldn't see our flowers and fruit trees for the clouds of bees :-).
I am going to plant something else next year. I was hoping to get some suggestions from this group as to what. Hopefully from those in similar climates (Zone 5 - irrigation required).
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 12 Oct 2003 08:35:00 -0700, Larry Blanchard

Are you only interested in zucchini, or would any summer squash do?
Judging by our experience with White Bush Scallop PattyPan squash this summer (also Zone 5), they are very productive.
WARNING: the plant (ONE plant) got to be about 15 feet in diameter. The thing was tremendous - reminiscent of 'Little Shop of Horrors'. But it sure did have lots of squash.
Another warning: the squash are shaped sort of like a UFO and it would be more difficult to peel them than to peel a zucchini. I ate them without peeling and found them OK that way, but some people might not like them for that reason.
I've read that this particular variety has identifiably been around since 1722. Now that's an heirloom vegetable!
{at
--
To email me, remove the trap and type my first
name in its place.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@meadows.pair.com says...

tomatoes along one or two sides. I'll have to pass on the squash that ate Texas :-).
We've always grown either zucchini or yellow straight or crook neck. The "cucumber" shape is the easiest for slicing, breading, and deep frying, which is the way we like them best. Is the taste of the patty pan types different, or just the shape?
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 08:57:16 -0700, Larry Blanchard

Pretty much the same taste. Just a different shape.
Pat
--
To email me, remove the trap and type my first
name in its place.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Initially, our Raven hybrids produced all male blossoms but after just a week or so went on to produce plenty of females as well. They produced steadily all summer long with an interruption by squash borers which we fixed by the old fashioned method instead of using Sevin and killing all the bees. I had a plentiful supply which continues (albeit far less now) here in Missouri Z 5b. I am still picking a few and I imagine they will not stop until the frost (we nearly had a frost--- 34--- but we got lucky). Lovely warm fall weather now and the garden is producing fairly well yet. My zuchetta tomboncinos are much more lively but we planted those in late august. I will definitely plant Ravens again for their ability to produce in quantity over a long period, recover from various stresses and for their lovely taste and dark green, unblemished appearance.
Now I also highly recommend the tromboncinos but you'd better give them tons of space--- up, down and all around. They produce like crazy, rooting (HUGE roots lol) along their strong, prolific vines. They need no assistance in climbing. I am going to try them with our corn next year.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.