winter tomato crop

Is it possible to plant any type of tomato now ready for a winter cro
? I have just been reading this article here http://tinyurl.com/noas8 But i am not sure of what type of tomato to sow. They would out side in big pots.
Thank
-- terryd
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On Sun, 6 Aug 2006 19:18:01 +0100, terryd

That's an interesting article. I grow Stupice for my early tomatoes in the spring, and I agree with their description. They're great little tomatoes.
I've never thought about growing a winter crop before, though. I was given to understand that the lower light levels combined with the cold made it almost impossible. Now I'm tempted to try a fall crop and see if I can have Thanksgiving tomatoes.

Are you going to bring them inside during cold snaps?
Penelope
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Later plantings gave me thanksgiving tomatoes, but in the smaller varieties.
If I wintered over tomato plants in large pots in the greenhouse, I managed to get ripe tomatoes in mid-March. The low light cycles don't allow them to bloom or set, even with artificial lighting to keep them warm during freezes.
I might try a timer system using colored bulbs for the "dark" time just for warmth. I've not gone that far yet. ;-)
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Yes , I always have a fall crop. I recommend tomatoes with a short maturity like Early Girl ( 52 days). You need to get your plants started now and transplant as soon as you can, or leave in large pots if you prefer. You will have to mulch well and keep them well watered during August and most of September but late September and October will be your best growing period. Depending on your start date, fresh tomatoes in late October and thru November until our first frost. If we are lucky, here in the Austin area, we can sometimes grow until December before the first frost. I also suggest a fall bell pepper crop. Cool mornings and warm afternoons really produce good bells.
Have Fun
JEM

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