Winter's Arrival

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It's right on schedule. LIght rain clearing to a cloudy and windy day with falling temperature. Predicted ±30° (-1,C) tonight; ±26° (-3,C) tomorrow night. Fortunately, the chill will be short duration but, naturally, the late "English" peas are in full bloom; showing just a few tiny nascent pods. I guess that's the way it's 'sposed to be. Most years yield at least _some_ nice fresh winter peas but this year's "late" peas really were late: That is, late planted. Lows are expected to be back to the more usual mid-50s midweek, though, so I'm covering in hopes of saving the plants, if not the blossoms.
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Derald
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They are predicting a low of 2°F her tonight. I don't know that I want to go out of the house tomorrow.
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USA
North Carolina Foothills
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    Same here. Predicted high in mid-40s tomorrow which probably will keep me indoors, too! At least this little chlly spell should knock the rest of the leaves off the trees, giving the garden here a few more hours of afternoon sun.
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The Cook wrote:

i haven't been outside since last Sunday other than to put something in the garage and that was close enough. Ma shovelled yesterday but it was pointless as the winds have filled it all in again. probably will wait until Wednesday to shovel again.
not much is moving around here on the roads as i think they are saying if you aren't an emergency vehicle or plow stay off the roads. we've not seen a plow today and people have been trying to go down our road and then backing up because they can't get through.
wind chills will keep things very cold (-20F - -35F) tonight and tomorrow. i'm glad i don't have to be anywhere. later in the week we'll get above freezing again. any garden plants are well insulated under about 2ft of snow.
songbird
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At these temps, a flat tire could kill you. Stay home unless it is an emergency.
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Billy wrote: ...

we're good! :)
today was the first day i got out and shoveled a bit. the end of the drive was the usual snow plow frozen mass of goodness. tonight will be cold again but then things will warm up for a while, above freezing even.
what you been up to?
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Foxfire is a neat idea.
Just remember that the articles are reported by and thus filtered through high school students. Back when I was one, I tried to follow some of the woodworking information as provided by Foxfire, and it didn't work out overly well. Decades later, I can see some gaping holes in what was written .vs. what was actually being done, having learned a thing or seventeen from other sources and experience...
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Cats, coffee, chocolate...vices to live by
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Ecnerwal wrote:

yes, it is a project of reporting, describing, i have other wood working books with much more detail and descriptions. :) no worries as most of what i would be interested in would be simple things needed in case of "having to" as compared to now where i can armchair any of it if i need to.
the same for about any other item in the books, they are a basis for thinking and further reading points if i need to.
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Billy wrote:

...about books...

when it becomes generally legal i expect they will have the same type of regulations that they have for the home brewers. i.e. small amounts ok, but if you are selling it expect to be licensed and paying taxes.
...

me either, not on that topic...

i think i have that one around here some place. tried to find it to see if it was the exact same book or not but i can't find it ATM. ah well. :)

i still haven't seen that one or read the book. it's on my someday list.
...water...

my guess is that things will change rapidly once people have to make a choice between eating and drinking and washing their cars or many other wasteful things done with the current water supply. something simple like using composting toilets can save a huge amount of water, but that takes a major change of mind set for some people and they won't do it until forced or the generation changes through time.

i'm past it now. doing fine. we took a walk today for the first time in a few weeks. up and down the road a few miles. nice to have a bit of sunshine and warmer temperatures. then we got most of the ice off the drive that hadn't finished melting yet.

we have mongrel squash, i have no idea where the seeds are from or if they've bred true. very good though with big meaty seeds. i've also got the seeds from the acorn squash to propagate for next year too.

no, Mars is too close, i want to go to another earth like planet in another solar system entirely. :) as i am older and somewhat decrepit there is very little chance anyone would take me. i can only daydream and work on the problems of complete closed system growing and nutrition. in the meantime i keep the birds, bees and other critters happy.
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Billy wrote: ...

ah, found it! yes, that's one of the references i have here, a little dated as it was published around 1999... but not too bad compared to some of my other references. i'm finding bits of it purely delusionary, but that's just me. still a good jumping off point for other references at the end of each section. some references to the Foxfire books in there too.
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Which of the Foxfires do you find helpful, or are you just a curious sort?
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Billy wrote: ...

hahaha, curious, yeah, but also find it interesting to read up about mountain folk as i did live in the hills for a few years. and some things i read in their interviews aren't mentioned in other references, so it adds some depth or experience that i would not have otherwise. just in case i actually ever have to do any of these things.
i've not read through all of them yet, but each seems to keep my interest enough to make them worth it.
right now i'm reading Zinn's _People's History..._ you recommended to me last year. very interesting there too. Jackson, wow...
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Yeah, the beginnings of modern politics. Talk one way, and act another.

History is a contentious subject. A national standard curriculum was advocated in in the 80s in response to a study called a "A Nation at Risk: The Imperative For Educational Reform". Most everything was agreed to, except history. Some see history as Christian Europeans bringing civilization to the unwashed masses, others, however, like Zinn, see the contributions, good and bad, made by all people to history. The standard curriculum was never ratified.
A good companion book to Zinn's "People's History" is "Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong" by James W. Loewen. <Everything/dp/0743296281/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid91047674&sr=1- 1&keywords=Lies+my+teacher+taught+me> From Publishers Weekly Loewen's politically correct critique of 12 American history textbooksincluding The American Pageant by Thomas A. Bailey and David M. Kennedy; and Triumph of the American Nation by Paul Lewis Todd and Merle Curtiis sure to please liberals and infuriate conservatives. In condemning the way history is taught, he indicts everyone involved in the enterprise: authors, publishers, adoption committees, parents and teachers. Loewen (Mississippi: Conflict and Change) argues that the bland, Eurocentric treatment of history bores most elementary and high school students, who also find it irrelevant to their lives. To make learning more compelling, Loewen urges authors, publishers and teachers to highlight the drama inherent in history by presenting students with different viewpoints and stressing that history is an ongoing process, not merely a collection ofoften misleadingfactoids. Readers interested in history, whether liberal or conservative, professional or layperson, will find food for thought here. Illustrated. Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.
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Billy wrote:

...

here, yes, i doubt however that in any other country that there haven't been eras like this one with their politicos.

considering the issues involved i could see why. the saddest things though to me are that we could have had such an interesting country otherwise, one that contained groups of people who actually knew how to live off the land. so much knowledge lost, languages and cultures destroyed, etc.

i've been reading a lot of history lately. time to get back to basics. plants, dirt, critters, science, etc. are up next. the title sounds familiar and if it is much of a rehash i'll skip it. as i told Ma, after reading through the anti- slavery and civil war rhetoric, several presidential biographies, and now almost done with Zinn's book, i'm ready to ponder other topics. i'll continue on with the Firefox books i've not read yet.
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"When the facts change, I change my opinion. What do you do, sir?" - John Maynard Keynes
Good reading :O)
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Billy wrote: ...

yes, here is an interesting one:
http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2014/01/27/ice-cover-affects-lake-levels-in-surprising-ways/
and another i'm waiting to download at the moment...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Index_of_Sustainable_Economic_Welfare
also, i did get the movie called _The Corporation_ that you mentioned before, if you haven't already gotten ahold of the 2 disk special edition i suggest a review as there looks to be some interesting material on there. ;)
peace, etc.
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I'll do that. Zeitgeist Films, c2005 ?
Thanks.
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Billy wrote:

...

ah, sorry, i already returned it, i'm not sure what the date on it was, it was a two disk collection or special edition.
now that i've watched them, in retrospect, most of it was rather much the same, only some of the links provided were worth the time to look at. i guess i am not much into advertizing ethics or some of the other issues, as they did not really inform me any more than i'd already picked up.
in the film itself:
however, i do have to say that the water war footage in (Guatamala i think it was) was rather stark. showing a sniper, in plain clothes, calmly walking up to a line of soldiers countering protestors, crouching down and taking someone out, wow. just wow. caught on film, no edits, no cuts away, just one sequence of film. cold blooded murder.
in the afterwards it is noted that Bechtel is seeking damages of some amount from the country/government.
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Yeah, that was Cochabamba, Bolivia, and it included the water that fell from the sky. All the water belonged to Bechtel. Our Senator Feinstein's husband sat on the board of directors of Bechtel.
In The Declaration of Independence it says, "for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor."
Then in the Pre-amble to the U.S. Constitution it says, "We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America."
Maybe it's just me, but it looks like things got a little skewed-up. We are we, until it comes to profit. Then it's mine, mine, mine.
The follow up to the original report is about 3 min. long. <
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4EQ4YMb6-A&feature=related

The original segment from the film is about 5 min. long. <
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xw5Fon_EjGw
?

In a few years, if you want a breath of fresh air, you'll be able to buy it at a store.
We are hoping for a couple of hundredths of an inch more rain tonight. Wish us luck.
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Billy wrote:

Here we have a concept related to rainwater called 'harvestable right' . It means that roughly 10% of the rain that falls on your land is yours to do with as you wish, the rest must available for the environment or be allowed to run down to the rivers for others to use. In practice it limits the size of the dam you can build and the kind of waterway you can build it on. If for example a permanent river crosses your land you can't dam that.
On top of that if you are on "permanent" fresh water, a river or lake, you can pump from it (while it runs) without charge for 'bona fide domestic purposes'. This includes stock watering, human consumption and gardens. There is no specified limit to this in terms of volume although if you were taking huge amounts somebody might come around and ask exactly what you are doing with it. If you were irrigating on a commercial scale or selling it you would be fined. If you want to irrigate on a commercial scale you have to buy a water license.
Any attempt by government to take away any of these rights would have dire consequences at the ballot box, as despite the fact that Oz is very urban the cities have a romantic attachment to the 'bush' and a well organised campaign by farmers would gather many votes.
For the small landholder and those running sheep or cattle this is a good system. As for irrigators it seems they are never happy regardless of government, policy, rainfall or anything else.
David
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