Will fall-planted carrot seeds grow in spring?

All summer long, every few weeks, I did a new planting of carrots. Most did not germinate. I planted different varieties from different vendors, so I know the seed wasn't the problem. I think it may have just been too hot all summer (temperatures regularly 100 and above). As a result, two of my beds now have tons of un-germinated carrot seeds in them. One of them holds garlic now, and the other has the wilted remains of peanuts.
I am wondering if some of the seeds may sprout and grow into carrots next spring. I know that you can plant onions in the fall and have them sprout first thing in spring; would this apply to carrots as well? I have noticed a few sprouts since the weather got cooler, but they haven't really done much, as it is quite cold at night. Do carrot seeds just stay sleeping all winter and sprout in the spring like onions do? --S.
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Suzanne D. wrote:

I stuck some grocery store carrots in the ground a few years ago and grew them out because my wife likes Queen Anne's Lace (wild carrot.) They grew about 5 feet tall, seeded, and now I get volunteer carrots every year -- it's just like dill; hard to get started, but then reseeds readily. So I think that means fall-planted seeds work better than planting in the spring. But it may depend on the climate.
(BTW, the volunteer carrots have tough mostly white roots, not yellow or orange)
Bob
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I'm guessing you have Queen Ann's Lace in the area, so they crossed.
Gary Woods AKA K2AHC- PGP key on request, or at home.earthlink.net/~garygarlic Zone 5/6 in upstate New York, 1420' elevation. NY WO G
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Utah wasn't it? Why plant a cool weather crop in the summer heat?
As to your question; in the wild seeds have to overwinter to survive, so yes it is possible, although I would not imagine not in your climate extremes. Besides today's crops are a far hybrid journey from their wild roots.
So while possible, your overwintered seed bed can be a breeding ground for carrot diseases*, so practice safe gardening. Besides if you get a good soil freeze you will kill most of them off. Also, I would destroy any volunteers that do come up and rely solely on tested seed stock. There can be good and bad reasons why Volunteers survive, for example; an undesirable throwback to earlier breeding stock. If you are into food production you don't have the time to spend finding out why. That's a dollar waiting on a dime. Besides, you want to grow seed stock a ways from your garden anyway and rotate your crops .
A technique you can use on your seed stock is to try to germinate prior to planting to see if they are viable. a simple wet paper towel in a sunny window is usually sufficient. That way you know it is not the seed before you plant and can concentrate on the garden variables. BTW, Carrot seeds don't transplant well so these are on a suicide mission.
Some guidelines to review:
http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/publication/HG_2004-12.pdf
http://www.soilzone.com/Library/Crops/Carrot/Carrot%20production%20in%20California.pdf
http://www.carrotmuseum.co.uk/cultivation2.html
BTW white root is touched on in these links
*Integrated Approaches for Carrot Pests and Disease Management from General Concepts in Integrated Pest and Disease Management By Aurelio Ciancio, K. G. Mukerji
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Because they all grew wonderfully last summer in the exact same temps.
Anyway, I'm not really LOOKING to grow carrots from dormant seeds. I was just wondering if I might expect to see them come up next year. --S.
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wrote in message news:5radnfvY-

Yes, you may, but carrot seeds in the soil are usually short lived and don't need stratification.
Interesting you say "wilting remains of peanuts"? How did those do for you? do you grow them often? same bed?
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wrote in message news:5radnfvY-

Yes, but different beds. Last year's bed was in the shade, and this year's was in the sun, which may have made the difference. Or the soil could have been finer in the other bed. I will try them in the shady bed again next year and see if I get better results.

I tried peanuts for the first time this summer, because this area is similar in climate to the Deep South (this area used to be a booming cotton town, and it was originally called Dixie before they re-named it St. George). But they didn't do very well. I may try again, but I mainly grew them as a curiosity, as I also did with cotton (which did VERY well!). I like growing weird things alongside the tomatoes and onions! Sometimes I do very well, and sometimes I don't, but it's cool trying. --S.
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'Suzanne D.[_2_ Wrote: > ;866916']All summer long, every few weeks, I did a new planting of > carrots. Most did

> so I

> hot all

> beds

>

> next

> sprout

> noticed

> done

> all

I have done this and the carrots germinated then overwintered. Did get some carrots the following year.
Personally I would hedge your bets and do some now and some in the spring.
--
grownforyou


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I am noticing some are germinating now.

Well, I didn't do this on purpose; I am just curious about all the seeds that I planted all summer that are still un-germinated in the ground that is now growing cooler and moister. I wouldn't deliberately try to plant carrots this time of year, but these were already planted, months ago! I will definitely start a whole new bed in the spring. --S.
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