Why Heirloom Tomatoes??

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Not my cup of tea. Last time I had it, it was awfully grainy and coarse. Tell me it's improved and I'll try it again. I prefer the Tinkyada rice pasta... most of which I get via Amazon.

Eighty percent of the time, we go almost straight from winter to summer with almost no spring (DH often plants the peas at the end of February). But I will certainly give that a try. In Ohio, I had gorgeous nasturtiums and great salads. :) Mmmm... the texture of the leaves is so choice.

Lovely!
Our Butterfly bushes are still blooming strong (among others). What a great long-season bloomer--- and so fragrant too. It looks like we'll have some Autumn Joy this year. The zappers have, so far, kept the darn deer away from it. They just love those succulents.
Isabella
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Absolutely!
Huh. I'll have to check that out. I don't eat a lot of pasta as I live low carb for the most part.

Have you tried just shading them, or growing them as an indoor plant?

I like them and they save me on water for landscaping. I also want to put in more rosemary. The city uses that a lot for the same reason. That and various salvias.

I bought a butterfly bush but it's still in it's pot. I'm re-doing the landscaping in front of the front porch. The only rosebushes that live for me are climbing blazes. I need to tame the beast and put her on a trellis. <g>
There is a Crepe myrtle to one side that blooms all year. I'm trying to keep that one pruned into a tree.
My cannas used to bloom all year but water is getting more expensive so I don't water them enough anymore. I plan to dig them all up and put them into a smaller raised bed, then plant spineless cacti in their spot. I have some San Pedro in the greenhouse, and will also use some of the local spineless prickly pear.
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With celiac and thyroid, my diet already has enough restrictions so I don't do strict low-carbing though I do pay strong attention to the glycemic index of foods. I restrict pasta to once weekly or less, potatoes even less often, and my DH and I hardly ever have baked goods or bread. BLTs with the fabulous tomatoes in late summer are an exception--- mine on rice bread of course. My daughter eats everything OTOH. I've always been fond of Julia's 'everything in moderation' advice and, more recently, Michael Pollan's: "Eat food, mostly plants, not too much" advice.

Shade doesn't work. I think maybe they like cool nights and, with the exception of this unusual summer, our July and August nights usually stay in the 80s, rarely dipping below 78 degrees. We have low-E glazing throughout this house so plants don't do as well indoors. It's challenging just to get my rosemary to survive the winter indoors. But, it's worth a try for nasturtiums. :)

Isn't that a rambler? What about bourbons and teas? Or do they need a lot of humidity? Only a few bourbons will grow easily here, even on their own roots.

Ours get nipped back sometimes by cold weather and survive mainly as bushes.

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Sounds good. :-) I'm also hypothyroid, and insulin resistant.
Interestingly enough, the dietary restrictions I ended up with actually netted me a MORE varied diet! I started branching out and trying new things.
I'm now in love with the asian market.

Well, they do mature rather quickly! It's one of the things I love about them. You may be able to at least grow them seasonally.

Only if I let it. <g>

I should put in another climbing peace. We had that one for several years and it smelled heavenly and produced large, showy blooms.

They are pretty tough.
Where are you? I'm in central Texas, Austin area.
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The autoimmune spectrum now affects a very significant portion of the population. Scary. Have you read _Dangerous Grains_?

Asian cooking taught me to make up dishes on the fly. I consider the stir-fry one of the all-time great cooking methods because you can stir fry practically anything. And what a boon for those of us with our own edible gardens. However, I do miss eating out at Chinese restaurants since it's nearly impossible to get anything that is gluten free. [...]

30+ miles due west of St. Louis. Zone 6. I see you're 8. Big difference!
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No, do tell?
I understand that "modern wheat" is a hybrid of Spelt. And not any near as healthy...

Ditto! <g>

I appear to be ok with that for the most part. We rarely eat out at all any more.
I'm a better cook. <g> And it saves money.

Huh. I must confess to not being too knowledgeable about zones. :-( I feel ignorant and have never paid much attention to them. I understand the concept ok.
I just know what I can grow, and what I can't, and what works in the greenhouses I have.
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Spelt has the same gluten (gliadin, etc) molecules as any triticum species including modern wheat & rye. For people with celiac or true gluten intolerance, it's all the same poison.
Isabella
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As are Oats and Barley.
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The jury is still out on oats since they do not contain gliadin. But it does contain a different gluten molecule to which some people with celiac respond. Some say oats not contaminated with wheat are OK but I'm not willing to take the risk with any oats. I was unsure whether barley had the same kind of gluten molecules as the triticums. Barley may have the other kind of gluten called glutenin or something like that... not sure.
Isabella
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I've never actually reacted to Barley, at least not in the past...
but I tend to stick to rice now. There are so many varieties. :-) I don't use white rice at all. Just brown and varieties of red and black.
The asian market has never been so fun. <g>
I have some chicken foot stock I'm planning to make some rice with probably this weekend, as soon as the 15 bean soup is gone that I made with ham skin stock. Dad's really enjoying it, and I'm glad! He can use the fiber load.
Since I cook for him, I keep track of what he eats. Care and feeding of an elderly parent is a big responsibility and fortunately, he likes my cooking.
I'm considering deboning some of the chicken feet and pureeing them to add, but it might make the rice a bit too rubbery when it's cold. <g>
I'm using chicken foot "meat" right now to help heal degenerative disk disease and arthritis. That and trotters. The type II collagen they contain seems to be keeping the pain at bay if I eat enough of it, and am consistent. It just took awhile at first.
Thank the gods for good chiropractors...
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Wheat allergy is it then?

Needless to say, rice figures big on our menu as well, though in the summer we rarely have it since there is so much from the garden. About the only white rice I ever have is with sushi. I've heard you can make it with a brown sticky rice but I've never found it. I put wild rice (from Minnesota) in lots of things as well, including some winter salads.

Ruth Reichl has a wonderful part in her _Garlic and Sapphires_ book, when she was the NYT restaurant critic, about eating duck webs at a Chinese restaurant.

You're doing an anti-inflammatory diet then?
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Seems to be... altho' I can tolerate ramen pasta if I limit the quantity. :-) Bread makes me the sickest of all.
And it shoots my glucose levels up too. :-(

Did not know there was brown "sticky rice", but the glutinous red rice might work. I rarely buy it tho' because it dyes anything you add to it red. <g> Some of the black rices color everything dark purple!

<lol> The asian market sells duck feet. I have eaten them, but only from ducks we had raised ourselves and home processed. I used to raise muscovies. Mom taught me years ago how to blanch and peel feet.
We tried it with emu feet, but only once. The flavor was "undesirable".
I'm wishing I could get turkey feet. :-( I'd probably have to find a processing plant for that. Not sure where the closest one is.

More or less... More of a "high collagen" diet. :-) I don't have rheumatoid. It's degenerative.
I've done some searches on the web tho' and it appears the consumption of what they are calling Type II collagen is having some real impact as an alternative therapy for both Osteo and rheumatoid arthritis.
Chicken collagen has 10 times the bioavailability of shark cartilage!
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wrote:

Would you share that research?
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Google for "Chicken collagen for Arthritis".
Here are the links I had stored:
<http://www.bodyandfitness.com/Information/Weightloss/Research/collagen.h tm>
<http://www.truestarhealth.com/members/cm_archives07ML4P1A2.html
<http://www.springboard4health.com/books_online/collagen/collagen_typeII . html>
My personal findings...
After 4 weeks of regularly consuming both chicken feet and trotters (pigs feet), my pain from the issues with my back was considerably less. I quit eating them for about 2 weeks (got bored) and had a serious relapse. I could not hardly even sleep due to the pain. :-( I refuse to take opiates even tho' they were offered.
I got back into it for 3 more weeks and right now, as of last Wednesday night, I'm not entirely pain free, but it's toned down to a bearable level. ;-)
And since I'm trying to lose weight using a low carb diet, it's a cheap source of protein for the most part. Trotters run around $1.04 per lb. and chicken feet are costing me around $1.49 per lb. I'm consuming 2 to 4 lbs. per week.
It's making a believer out of me and has had three other benefits. My skin tone is improving drastically, as is the appearance and strength of my fingernails. I also tend to get a lot of hair thinning on top of my head when I'm losing weight and that is not happening this time. ;-) I've lost 20 lbs. since the end of May 2008. I'm 46.
If you find trotters and chicken feet to be unappealing, (I totally understand the concept of food appearance), just debone them and make the meat and stock into soup. It helps.
I use a pressure cooker. Chicken feet need to be pressured for 45 minutes. Trotters, one hour. Braising will take longer. They need to be cooked until all the connective tissue turns into jelly.
I've not yet explored calves feet for my personal issues, but calves foot Jelly (recipes can be googled) appear to help my 76 year old dad with energy levels and memory issues.
Anecdotal of course, but it works for us, and he loves the stuff.
The concept I think is eating cuts of "meat" that are high in collagen and connective tissue. Skin, ligaments, tendons and cartilage.
History: I took a very bad fall the end of April 2008 and have had a lot of pain since then. X-rays showed a 16 degree scoliosis of the lumbar spine and advanced Degenerative disk disease. The last two disks of the lower lumbar spine are essentially gone. The Scolisis is causing a tilt to the Sacral plate and pelvis.
It's like a runaway case of Sciatica from hell..
The Osteopath and the Chiropractor both recommended swimming and and inversion table. The rest I've done on my own. <g> I'm swimming 20 laps 4 days per week and using the inversion table intermittently.
The high collagen diet seems to be helping more than anything, and a good chiro' (I got references before choosing one) is worth their weight in gold. I've also purchased a muscle stim' unit after getting some treatments using one at the Chiro's office. It's the gods...
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wrote:

Thanks Om, the first link is no longer available but I will read the rest as well as all your posts here.
thanks
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Sorry about that. I did check it before posting so it must have just gone down. :-(
Hope the rest helps.
I literally feel your pain if you are having similar issues!
I'm happy to post recipes for the stuff if needed, but some people just can't stand the texture. Fortunately, I happen to like it but individual tastes vary!
Standard stock aromatics. Onion, garlic, carrot, celery, lemon peel, ginger root, pepper.
Salt to taste.
Cheers...
--
Peace! Om

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wrote:

I'm way too young to be so damned old. Years of living with my house on my back has caught up, still trying to figure out what type. done all the therapy protocols except for the gold so far. Thank god for prednisone and vicodin, but awaiting to see what that lapdance is going to cost me. Tapering now and it is returning.
Interesting study, different than what I thought it would be, still like to see larger studies and more peer review. Just read a study where knee surgery don't relieve the pain anymore than exercise except in joint replacement, but I read the 10 year warranty on that is just for parts and doesn't cover additional diagnostics and labor costs and most likely ya still have to replace it. So I will not get the entire front end replaced quite yet but will do some adjustments later this month.
The thought of feet/hooves is not particularly appealing but I can go with hocks/oxtails to get the collagen, just not in a glue pot kinda way. going to have to come up w/ a recipe with hocks, cabbage, ginger, peppers and turmeric, an Asian meal start already.
Thank again Om
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I'm only 46. Geezus Gunner! You already know the price of Prednisone. :-(

Hope it helps babe! Just remember that nutritional therapy takes time. Won't help overnight. It took me originally around 4 weeks to feel the difference.
I know the sight is unappealing. Debone the trotters to get rid of the "shape" and mash them into soup. ;-)
Ox tails are expensive around here, but OH so good!
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I do hope you've had a screening TTG done--- though false negatives are not unusual if you're not consuming much gluten.
Isabella
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Glucose Tolerance Test?
We've pretty much done away with those and use the HA1C test instead. My A1C level runs around 5.5 to 5.6. Normal is max of 6.5. :-)
I'm not a type II diabetic yet, but I'm trying to head there. It's why I'm being so careful with my diet. Starch (and sugar) have been relegated to "treat" status.
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