Which vegetables can be planted this month?

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I'd wait until second leaf at least and what is the temp of the green house. Soil for tomatoes should be at least 70F to plant them. Check temp requirements for the others.
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Freedom_Spark said:

When the roots start poking out of the starter pots (they should have a few leaves beyond the first 'seed leaves' by then), I'd pot them up in a larger size pot. Then after they put on some more growth, slowly start getting them accustomed to their eventual outside conditions. (This could take a few days.) After that, in the ground or growbag. Should probably have roots growing all over the in-between pot by then, too.
(I think all the seeds that are going to sprout from my April 12 planting have done so. Except for one heirloom tomato variety, the germination has been very good. Lucky thing for me I decided right at planting time to increase the number of starts for that one. Two of four haven't shown at all, and only one of the remaining two is actually a viable seedling.)
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Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

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What's happened to my lettuce seedlings??? :-(
Just as I thought I was getting the hang of this gardening thing, went out to check on them yesterday & alot of my tiny little lettuc seedlings have been uprooted, I've no idea what happened, I'm going t hope some have survived & start a few more on the inside & try & ge them past their early, delicate phase before planting out.
Anyone have any ideas what may have went wrong
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Sounds like a garden predator.
Build a chicken wire cage over them.
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Peace! Om

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Freedom_Spark said:

seedlings or nipping off larger ones. I have a set of bird netting which I use to protect my sweet corn plantings--I have actually watch a bird pull up the tiny shoots to nip off the seed. And I have small wire tents I put over squash and sunflower seeds.
Another possibility would be four-footed critters digging in that nice, soft garden soil. Cats are notorious for this. And they can leave...presents...
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Thanks, I closed off a small gap beside my gate & since then ther
hasn't been any damage, must have been the neighbour's cat, because al of our dogs are too big to have made it through.
Any way, a few more questions...
My radishes, lettuce, garlic, carrots etc. all seem to be doing quit well however, I'm slightly worried about my red onions they wer planted as bulbs & there has been no noticable growth, what should I b seeing by now?
Also, would there be any reason that my courgettes appear to be growin roots upwards :-S I hope there's no specific way seeds have to b planted I just randomly throw them in the tray & push them dow slightly.
Also, a sweet pepper question, do they require alot of heat to gro because I've had a few in trays just with propogator lids on top but n sign of germination as yet.
Thanks again everyone I'll get the hang of it eventuall
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Onions look like a tall and slightly more sturdy grass coming up. I've got three yellow ones so far, and they were planted about a week ago.

Some seeds ARE picky about how they're planted. Green beans, for example, start growing roots at the "eye". Nice thing about them is they right themselves as they come out of the ground.
Most of the time you can just replant it properly and it'll do ok.

What's your seed packet say? (This is my first year with peppers, too. Not sure where they are in the garden, either...)

Have fun, and remember that even seasoned gardeners run in to problems. ;-)
Puckdropper-- You can only do so much with caulk, cardboard, and duct tape.
To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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On Tue, 29 Apr 2008 21:09:12 +0100, Freedom_Spark

How long since you planted? Depending upon depth, temperature, etc, they can take a while. If curious, gently remove soil and check for growth.

How deeply did you cover them? 1/2 to 1 inch is good. If they are just slighty covered, you likely may be seeing roots. Give 'em a little more cover if this is the case.

Yes....85F is optimal for germination of peppers, plus peppers take longer to germinate. I've some that took two weeks even with 85F.
Don't set peppers into the garden until nighttime temps are consistently above 50F.

Yes, you will. Remember, "There are no gardening mistakes, only experiments." -- Janet Kilburn Phillips :-)
Charlie
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On Tue, 29 Apr 2008 21:09:12 +0100, Freedom_Spark

Plants can sense the Earth's gravitational field. Geotropism is the term applied to the consequent orientation response of growing plant parts. Roots are positively geotropic, that is, they will bend and grow downwards, towards the center of the Earth. In contrast, shoots are negatively geotropic, that is, they will bend and grow upwards, or away, from the surface.
These geotropisms can be demonstrated easily with seedlings grown entirely in darkness. A seedling with its radicle (or seedling root) and shoot already in the expected orientation can be turned upside down, or placed on its side, while kept in darkness. The root will subsequently bend and grow downwards, and the shoot upwards. Because the plant is still in darkness, phototropism (a growth movement in response to light) can be eliminated as an explanation for these movements. http://science.jrank.org/pages/3032/Geotropism.html

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temp, according to the Vegetable Gardener's Bible, 80F to 85F is the optimum temperature for germination. Cooler or warmer will slow down or prevent germination.

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Billy

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Hi again everyone, back with more questions.
I got hold of a few strawberry plants, 8 in total just wondering what should do, someone recommended growing them in a hanging basket, an advice?
Also I have noticed a few nibbles out of my radishes & lettuce, I' beginning to think I might have slug issues & I know this might soun like a stupid question but is there any way I cold prevent them fro doing any damage without killing them? I've been a vegetarian since was 19, two years now & that was one of the main reasons I started th garden, killing the slugs just wouldn't feel right! (Most people I'v spoken to find that hilarious btw, so feel free to laugh ;-D)
Now a rhubarb question, I have looked everywhere for rhubarb to plan but no luck, what is the best method of growing rhubarb & where is th best place to find it?
Finally, at what stage should sweetcorn be planted out? I started som inside & the seedlings are looking really well, any advice on tha would be great.
Thanks again
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Freedom snipped-for-privacy@gardenbanter.co.uk says...

For example
http://www.leevalley.com/garden/page.aspx?c=1&pQ241&cat=2,51555
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*snip*
We simply put strawberries in the ground, spaced out during initial bed establishment. You can leave a foot or three between each plant, and the next couple years they'll have filled in the space. In the midwest US, strawberry season is going to start in about 3 weeks.

I'm not sure about transplanting, but my sweet corn (and everyone else's field corn) is coming up with its first set of true leaves. You can probably transplant anytime.
Puckdropper
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Freedom_Spark said:

As soon as possible. Be sure to get the plants gradually accustomed to being in direct sunlight. Keep them in small pots too long and you risk damaging or stunting the roots.
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Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

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