What's wrong with this tomato?

One of my bushes is producing fruit like this:
http://sowell.ecs.fullerton.edu/otherprojects/gardening/tomatoProblem.JPG
What's causing this? Will it spread to other plants?
TIA
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It's called Blossom end rot. It's caused by the soil drying out esp. as the fruit is forming. There is no treatment, that fruit is toast, but if you keep the compost moist the rest should be OK. Probably a good idea to remove any like that and the plant will put it's energies into the remaining/yet to come fruits.
Steve
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My understanding is there is nothing wrong with the tomato, just cut off the bad end. Also it has been said that you'll see it with the stress of first fruit, then it goes away.
If true lack of calcium in the soil is the problem BER foliar sprays exists to immediately benefit the plant and adding calcium (eggshells) should raise the calcium level in the soil. However, it is usually a water issue. Too dry and too wet. Too dry means the leaves aren't bringing nutrients up to the tomatoes. Too wet and the leaves are so busy perspiring moisture that the nutrients fast track to the leaves and deprive the fruit. Other problems can also cause it and other problems, but are less likely, like a bad ph or other deficiency that screws with the chemical reactions that the plant relies on to live. DiGiTAL ViNYL (no email) Zone 6b/7, Westchester Co, NY, <1 mile off L.I.Sound 3rd year gardener http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/royalfrazier/album?.dir=/2055&.src=ph
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On Sun, 17 Jul 2005 18:30:42 GMT, "Jag Man"

Maybe, Low magnesium, epson salt may help.
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Guess Who! wrote:

No, blossom end rot has to do with calcium. I believe calcium can be added, but keeping the soil evenly moist usually prevents the the developing fruits from having the deficiency in the first place.
Steve in the Adirondacks
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How Right you are, my mistake!

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Every gardener experiences this at one time or another. Don't worry. It's called blossom end rot and may have several causes. Check out: http://ianrpubs.unl.edu/horticulture/nf43.htm
Ross. Southern Ontario, Canada. New AgCanada Zone 5b 4317'15" North 8013'32" West To email, remove the obvious from my address.
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Thanks to all who responnded. I have the plants on a drip system in a space about 5 feet wide between the lawn and a block wall. The affected pllant is next to the wall, farthest from the lawn, so it could be it's not getting enough water. I'll give it an extra dripper.
Ed
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The wall, especially if it faces south could be absorbing a lot of heat and keeping temperatures higher. I've got a stone patio that really heats up during sunny days. That would put greater heat stress on the ones closest to the wall.
I've got a big overhang on the house and it can pour cats and dogs but the plants against the house barely get any rain. Even during wet months I have to hose them.
DiGiTAL ViNYL (no email) Zone 6b/7, Westchester Co, NY, <1 mile off L.I.Sound 3rd year gardener http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/royalfrazier/album?.dir=/2055&.src=ph
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On 7/17/05 11:30 AM, in article mtxCe.198$ snipped-for-privacy@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com,

I have some problems like that too. It is called blossom end rot. I have found that once the bad part of the tomato has been removed, the remainder can be very tasty.
Supposedly, it is caused by insufficient calcium. I grow my tomatoes hydroponicly. The nutrient supplier suggests adding calcium as calcium nitrate as well as magnesium in the form of Epsom salt also known as magnesium sulfate.
Bill
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