what kind of vegetable would you recommend to grow in front yard?

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The only place that is flat in my yard is in the front yard. I want to grow some vegiatables. What would you recommend to grow in front yard, so it is edible and looks good enough not to piss homeowner asscociation?
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Where I live (a nice suburban area) I can plant anything I want in my front yard (yes, I checked). I even had a scarecrow for a while, I am sure that neighbors complained, but the village could not do anything. I am trying to behave better in my new house though. See if your association has specific rules about planting stuff, maybe it does not and you can do anything you want.
I think that anything edible looks better than lawns. I would consider potatoes or low tomatoes.
i
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Mark wrote:

Strawberries or Kale.
..
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Thanks a lot. <<Strawberries or Kale>>
Are these one time a year crop or more? would they grow well in South California(San Diego)

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Mark wrote:

They should do fine there, especially the strawberries.
Frost probably isn't a concern but Kale is known for being very resistant to the cold (and often lasts well into December here). Kale is a member of the cabbage family, so you'd face the same concerns - like root maggot. I usually put a bit of newspaper around the plants and mulch on top.
If you get strawberries, get a day-neutral variety. You'll get berries well into the fall and they don't send out many runners that would overwhelm the garden. Get some transplants, plant them, pick the flowers off them for the first few weeks, then let them fruit. You should mulch them as well. Strawberry plants are good for 3 to 5 years.
..
Zone 5a in Canada's Far East.
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On 5 Jun 2006 13:32:20 -0700, in rec.gardens.edible "Mark"

Would it be unreasonable to suggest that you could terrace a portion of the back yard?
FACE
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wrote:

If we knew what USDA zone or other climate reference you are in, we might be able to offer more useful suggestions. Kales and leaf lettuces are beautiful, but it's already way too hot here in South Carolina for them.
There are lots of ornamental peppers, and some not intended as ornamentals that are very attractive. Tabasco peppers are beautiful, and tall enough to be planted at the back of a flower bed. It's looks like a giant candelabra with thousands of tiny, multi-color lights, *and* most big box stores carry Tabascos.
Most squashes have pretty blooms on them, although they can sprawl, so pick your variety carefully. A lot of peas have nice flowers, too, and can be trellised. Jerusalem Artichokes (Sunchokes) will make your homeowner's association think you're growing sunflowers. Sweet potatoes have nice blooms, too, although they may wonder why you're digging up the whole flower bed come fall.
Oh, and don't forget your herbs. If you're not too far north, rosemary makes an attractive shrub. Red basils double as ornamentals, and you could put some mint in hanging baskets for your front porch. You could actually do the whole front yard as a herb garden there are so many attractive herbs.
There are a lot of possibilities, but we need more information about your home. What zone, how much sunlight, how much room, and what did you have in mind to plant? Could you use planters, or do you want mostly in ground stuff?
Penelope
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snipped-for-privacy@mindspring.com says...

Eggplants come to mind.
        Bill -- Gmail and Google Groups. This century's answer to AOL and WebTV.
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wrote:

As Ms. Periwinkle stated, your Plant Hardiness Zone would be useful information to us.
Some determinant tomato plants might be decorative beside the front door walkway.
Be aware that ripe vegetables are targets for thieves.
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I grow habanero peppers along the sidewalk up to my front door. They were targeted only one time. :-)
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Buy a couple of dozen gaudy plastic hibiscus, lily, or rose blooms and fasten them to your corn stalks or over your potato plants!! That should flummox the ignorant busybodies! -- John Savage (my news address is not valid for email)
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Thanks a lot. This is exactly what I will do.
John Savage wrote:

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Mark wrote:

Andy writes:
Okra, and hang Xmas tree lights from them....
Andy
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Mark wrote:

Sweet corn, or pumpkins. HTH ;-)
Bob
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Mark said:

are okra and eggplant.
I also remember a tiny in-town front yard that was packed with paste tomatoes and basil. (It was the only sunny spot they had.) Looked strange, but very healthy and well-tended.
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snipped-for-privacy@someplace.net.net (Pat Kiewicz) wrote in

I had a similar reaction to the carrots I grew, but it was more "these look a lot better than parsley." I think given the chance I'd use carrot greens as a garnish and not parsley.
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Do a Google for "edible landscaping." There are a couple of really good books about it, and you'll probably be able to find lots of links that'll give you good ideas.
I always plant pansies and leaf lettuce (like Red Sails) in a pot next to my front door. (I'm in Zone 3, in Alaska.)
And I have my culinary herbs growing near the front door: chives, basil, rosemary, french tarragon, oregano, etc. They're pretty, they smell nice and they're neat to cook with.
It's too hot in 'dago this time of year, but Romanesco broccoli is a neat looking plant. You can grow that in the winter down there. Kale is also really pretty. Globe artichoke plants are neat looking -- they're just thistles. Those are all cool season crops, where you live.
Robert Kourick and Rosemary Creasy have both written good books on edible landscaping. (Bob Kourick was one of my teachers when I did my Master Gardener training in Marin County, CA. He's a hoot.)
Jan USDA Zone 3
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Mark wrote:

Peace,
Kate
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You'll probably do best with herbs. You can lay them out in a formal, European style garden plan and then when the snooty neighbors ask what this or that plant is, you can pluck a leaf or stem and eat it right in front of them. I imagine it could be fun to watch their reactions. :-)
Seriously, in addition to all the other good suggestions, including terraces or big containers in the back yard, letting some garlic and onions go to flower can add a nice touch as well. There are even some strictly ornamental onions that are bred just for this purpose.
J.
Mark wrote:

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Kohl Rabi are a novelty. Beetroot. Silver beet or coloured chard. The gold nugget pumpkins grow on a clumping bush not a trailing vine, and it's large leaves with golden fruit is attractive. Pole beans, especially coloured ones. Strawberries would look okay in a sunny spot. Rhubarb, too. Passionfruit. Not all these are vegetables, but they are edible. -- John Savage (my news address is not valid for email)
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