What is best to do over winter?

Hi
As I eat my way through this years summer veg I am thinking about the over-wintering situation.
I don't have enough space to both over winter some veg (which I would like to do), and dig in lots of well rotten manure and leave till spring.
I guess I could just chuck in loads of fertilizer, but I would rather not.
I have 3 beds, on a rotational system.
Any advice on how I can have my cake and eat it much appreciated.
--
anthony123hopki


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Read, learn and plan for spring :)
--
Enjoy Life... Dan

Garden in Zone 5 South East Michigan.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And you might consider putting in a PVC hoophouse. <http://westsidegardener.com/howto/hoophouse.html Otherwise Brassica (kale, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower), beets, parsnips, lettuce, spinach. All, but the last two, get sweeter in the cold.
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
anthony123hopki;896221 Wrote: > Hi

> over-wintering situation.

> like to do), and dig in lots of well rotten manure and leave till > spring.

> not.

You could do worse than sow some chard, spinach, rocket and also some of the 'oriental' veg like mizuma, pak choi. These will give you fresh greens late into the year. With a cloche covering they will survive all but the harshest weather too. Its not too late for kohl rabi either, spring cabbage and then what about garlic in october/november (for big bulbs next summer)?
--
AncientGardener


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
anthony123hopki wrote:

if you dig a deep enough trench and bury the manure it will still be there and extra cured when you dig it up in the spring (or late winter after the veggies are done). probably a bit compacted but still useful. or if you put it down a good foot it will probably be ok for the crops, but i would imagine that it would stimulate more soft growth than you might otherwise want (which is why i would bury it deeper).

i dig trenches and fill them with stuff as the season gets on. once in a while i put some dirt on top after the stuff has mostly dried out and had some fungus start on the lower layers. i'll water it if it looks too dry and then start the next layer. by the end of the season when i dig the trench next to it i bury it under at least six inches of dirt so that the roots from the plantings that go over aren't fighting through the stuff that is breaking down.
gradually it is turning mostly clay soil (with some added sand) into nice black dirt as i keep moving it back and forth from year to year. the shoveling helps break up the bigger stems that haven't quite finished breaking down. most of the rest of it is perfect. the worms love it.
this year i am going to dig a deep and narrow trench and fill it with dry stuff and some wood pieces i have, put some flat metal over it and then close off most of the ends and light it on fire, after it gets going i'm going to smother it and see if i can get a good percentage of charcoal pieces leftover. any big chunks i'll save for the next round. i don't have much woody stuff around here so it will be a slow addition.
hmm... *pondering* we have an old wood burning stove outside as decoration, but i'm not even sure it is functional. have to fight the hornets... hmm, worth a look actually, i might use that instead. must investigate further...
songbird
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.