What are green beans is you let them turn into beans?

This may seem a silly question...
I let a bunch of green beans-normally harvested as long pods for cut green beans turn into actually hard beans. Now they are the kind you would soak and boil to eat. But are the beanbeans of a green beans normally eaten under a different name? (Lima, kidney[not], etc) DiGiTAL ViNYL (no email) Zone 6b/7, Westchester Co, NY, <1 mile off L.I.Sound 2nd year gardener http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/royalfrazier /
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Not a different name, but many green beans are edible as shelling beans (beans filled out in the pod and shelled; cook quickly) and/or as dry beans. Vermont cranberry is normally used only for shell and dry; haven't tried the pods, but should!
And if they're not hybrids, you can use the mature dry beans for seed!
Gary Woods AKA K2AHC- PGP key on request, or at home.earthlink.net/~gwoods Zone 5/6 in upstate New York, 1420' elevation. NY WO G
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DigitalVinyl said:

Lima beans and 'green beans' are two different species. But 'green beans' are the same species as kidney beans and many other types grown to eat the seeds rather than the immature pods. You probably could eat the young pods of a kidney bean, but as that variety hasn't been selected for tender, stringless pods, it might not be pleasant eating.
Green beans that get away from you can be harvested at the fresh shell stage or allowed to form a dry bean. Since hybrid green beans are almost unheard of, and green beans almost always self-pollinate, you can use those dry beans to plant next year's crop if you don't eat them in bean soup. (Lima beans are insect pollinated and WILL cross between varieties. Which can get interesting.)
Lima or butter beans = Phaseolus lunatus Kidney, pintos, great northern, black beans, wax beans, green snap beans Phaseolus vulgarus
And to throw some more info, black-eyed peas and yardlong beans are two separate species in another genus entirely (Vigna).
--
Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

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So if you use them as shell beans, at what point should you harvest them?
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Jacqueline, another first-time veggie gardener
Carmichaels PA
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Full-sized in the pod, but not yet starting to dry out. Only need a brief steaming and a little butter.
Yum!
Gary Woods AKA K2AHC- PGP key on request, or at home.earthlink.net/~gwoods Zone 5/6 in upstate New York, 1420' elevation. NY WO G
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