uhoh

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i suspect i shall have a surplus of soybeans.
yesterday was the first chance i'd had to start shelling the harvest.
the first paper bag full came in over 5lbs (i think my whole harvest last year was about 4.5lbs).
i have another 8 - 15 bags yet to go (don't know for sure because some are still in trays drying).
in the meantime, i'm looking out the window at the first sleet/snow of the season and very glad i finished leveling two gardens last week and got the bulbs all replanted.
the second strawberry patch is mulched and the third strawberry patch is started with the potted transplants i had standing by (waiting for the beans to be finished and harvested). surrounded by garlic as there is no fence around that area and we have bunnies and deer that sometimes come through. however, this year we've had a hawk hunting and i suspect it has given the bunnies a challenge.
a dozen bags of shredded leaves to bury and mix in many gardens with the shredded bark to keep the worms happy for the winter. not going to put any of this on the clay out back as that already has had a good cover.
one last garden to chop and bury (the peas i planted in August) sometime this weekend when the weather is supposed to clear for a bit.
so back to the soybeans today. :) it's music to my ears hearing them bouncing off and rolling down the cardboard.
songbird
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Nice post Bird - sounds like life is good for you. Now, 'bout those soybeans.... How does one go about growing soybeans please? How deep, how far apart, what sort of soil conditions, when etc? and can you gorw soy beans from the stock you'd buy at a Health food shop or does one have to buy special seed soy beans. TIA.
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I have had luck sprouting the soy beans from out local weigh and pay so I see no reason why they wouldn't grow, if the wife didn't eat them. As to how deep and how far that's beyond me.
Mike
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wrote:

The directions on my purchased green soybean seeds say:     "Any good garden soil will grow soybeans. After last frost in spring, sow about 6 -10 seeds/ft., 1" deep, rows 15 - 30" apart depending on method of cultivation. Reduce seeding rate somewhat for more narrow row spacing. Thinning is not necessary."
Sounds pretty much like most beans I have grown.
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The Cook wrote: ...

4 inches minimum between plants. rows a foot apart is fine. after they get going you will not be able to walk between the rows anyways, but the plants support each other so having them too far apart means they might get blown over.
if you want a pathway you'll need 5ft at least. plants i grew this year went over a three foot spacing (strawberries and row of wax and green beans next to the strawberries, soybeans in the middle) and still flopped out over into the surrounding pathway. i've already decided next year to plant the soybeans in two bigger patches (instead of the seven small patches i did this year) because they overgrew so much of the plants around them. they can lean on each other. i'll probably double my productivity of the other bean patches this way.
songbird
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I had a good crop this year myself. I used the same culture as for bush beans. They got about 30 inches tall, I didn't use any support, but they probably could have used some late in the season. I picked about 1/2 in the green stage, blanched and froze them as edamame(delicious). They will probably become a yearly crop for me. Steve
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Steve Peek wrote: ...

green varieties aimed at edamame might be different from the kinds i've been growing for soymilk (dry beans) as these plants easily get 5ft tall for me here. the fields next to us the plants typically get about 3ft tall.
songbird
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OK, how about a recipe for the soy milk?
My seed came from Johnny's if anyone is interested. Steve
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Steve Peek wrote: ...

very easy,
- rinse beans[1] - soak beans in water for 24 hours, change the water a few times[2] - blend beans with some water until they are a fine slurry[3] - dump slurry into more water to cook[4] - when the foam goes away it's about done, cook a few more minutes[5] - strain to remove the pieces from the soymilk[6] - refrigerate, drink, cook with, etc[7] - the left over ground up cooked beans are edible and useful[8]
Notes:
[1] don't use funny looking beans (in the non-clown sense of funny). about 1.5 cups dry beans per gallon of finished soymilk (adjust up or down to taste).
[2] sometimes they make a popping noise. it's quite funny (in the clown sense of funny).
[3] the better blender you have the more you'll get from the bean and the less you'll have to filter off at the end. i use over a gallon of water to get a gallon of soymilk. a really good blender should lower how much water you'd lose after filtering. yes, you can make a mess if you blend too much at once.
[4] there is going to be a lot of foam, do not walk away as this will boil over, stir once in a while or it will burn.
[5] about 25-35 minutes.
[6] i use a wire sifter for one pour and then put it through a fine mesh (gold plated) reusable coffee filter to get the rest of the pieces out.
[7] excellent ingredient to use along with lite coconut milk for any red or green Thai curry.
[8] i eat some right away, a little sugar and cinnamon on top. also good in muffins, cakes, etc. but in the end, i feed some of it to the worm farm too, they love it.
google "Making Soy Milk" and the site that has the title milking the bean or something like that is the easiest description i've found.
for making tofu it's a few more steps, but not too hard. the just mentioned site covers this too.
:)
songbird
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Billy wrote: ...

i'm not caring about "winning" i just hate to see casual unfounded remarks that look like scare mongering put in their place.
normal consumption, a glass of soymilk a day, a few ounces of tofu, some soy sauce, a few teaspoons of fermented soy beans in a black bean sauce, a soy burger, all probably well within normal.
i'd say that more than 2lbs of soy products a day would be getting into the realm of abnormal. more than a lb a day borderline and less than that quite ok for most people.
the only qualification i see at this time in the literature is for pregnant or soon to be pregnant women.
Japan is not the only place that eats soy products. Thai, Indonesian, Indian, Chinese, etc. all use soy in various ways.
songbird
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Observing that exposure to phytoestrogens can facilitate the growth of breasts is fear mongering? Breasts are to be feared?

You'd say!? What is the support for what you say? Facts aren't something that you pull out of your backside.

Once again!? As charming as you are, bird, you are far too incompetent to be patronizing, as the following illustrates.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
What does that sentence say, bird? First, normal consumption isn't quantified. Then it says "should not", not "will not". So what the sentence says is that most people probably won't have a physiological response to phytoestrogens, because they don't consume soybeans beyond some undefined "healthy limit". It doesn't say eat as much phytoestrogens as you like, because there is no adverse physiological threat from them. At some point they become a problem, but that point is unknown.

Golllly, do tell. Who'd have thunk?
(This is a bit dated ['02], but still makes the point.) Some studies have reported no link and others have reported a decrease in the risk of breast cancer among women eating soy compared to women who did not eat soy; no studies have reliably demonstrated an increase in the risk of breast cancer among women eating soy. In addition to the conflicting results, there are four problems with these studies. First, the number of studies is small, only ten studies have examined soy in the diet and breast cancer risk. Second, most of the studies examined small numbers of women, only four of the studies included more than 200 patients. Third, all but two of the studies were limited to women from Asia. The effect of soy in Asian women may not best reflect much of the population of Western countries like the US. Women in Asia differ in important ways. Many of them have eaten soy products all their lives and their usual diets contain large amounts of soy products. Also, Asian women have low rates of breast cancer compared to Western women, which may be related to other factors besides soy in their diet. Fourth, most of these studies are limited by their focus on the general diet of women rather than soy products in detail. More carefully controlled studies are needed that examine the effect of soy products on breast cancer risk in women from cultures outside of Asia and more indepth studies are needed of Asian women.
Then soy isn't the only phytoestrogen game in town: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lavender_oil#Contraindications Lavender oil has recently been implicated in gynecomastia, the abnormal development of breasts in young boys.
Then there is the collateral damage from soybeans. <http://www.ajcn.org/content/93/5/950.abstract
2011 American Society for Nutrition Changes in consumption of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in the United States during the 20th century
Background: The consumption of omega-3 (n3) and omega-6 (n6) essential fatty acids in Western diets is thought to have changed markedly during the 20th century.
Results: The estimated per capita consumption of soybean oil increased

(LA)[omega-6] increased from 2.79% to 7.21% of energy (P < 0.000001), whereas the availability of ?-linolenic acid (ALA) [omega-3] increased from 0.39% to 0.72% of energy . . .
The ratio of LA to ALA increased from 6.4 in 1909 to 10.0 in 1999.
Predicted net effects of these dietary changes included declines in tissue n--3 highly unsaturated fatty acid status . . . and declines in the estimated omega-3 index.
You do know about the importance of omega-6/omega-3, don't you, bird?

I'd continue your instruction, but I have a football game to watch.
--

Billy

Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies in
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And it's also been recorded in at least one case that I recall that a person who drinks too much water can die from water.
If you don't want to eat soy products then there is no compulsion for you to do so despite what Bird chooses to do.
Then it says "should not", not "will not". So what the

And the same with drinking water.
Life is just one big risk. Perhaps we should all make a pact to slit our wrists right now before something else comes along that might give us a rash or kill us slowly.
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FarmI wrote: ...

uhg! sorry, i'm not that kind of follower or believer. i know you mean it as sarcasm, etc., but wow...
i think instead i'll just go back to SAVING THE FOREST LEAF LITTER and let it rest at that.
hope the game was good Billy. :)
peace,
songbird
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Nah. It was not meant as sarcasm, just a faint touch of whimsy.
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You hate for unfounded remarks that look like scare mongering to be put in their place, bird?
Q.E.D.
--
- Billy

E pluribus unum
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FarmI wrote:

it is good for me.

i've grown them from picking up seeds from the field next to us (likely a glyphosate resistant variety) and didn't like those for taste as much as the few lbs i picked up from the health food store that were labelled organic. i planted those this year and the difference was noticeable in terms of season, the ones i planted turned brown several weeks later than the soybean fields around us.
i space them 4-6 inches apart and rows a foot apart. 1-2 inches deep, they have pretty big leaves and smother anything growing within a few feet of them so don't plan on planting anything right next to them, or you can do what i did with some of them to thin them out (so the strawberries got some sunshine) i just trimmed off some of the leaves. i used the trimmings for green manure and worm farm food. chickens would probably eat them. :)
planted them after all danger of frost was past. in some cases i planted them even later, because i was waiting for some flowers to die back.
they will not flower or get pods right away. they are not like peas or green beans, you don't need to pick to encourage them to produce. as for pests, Japanese beetles and the other broad leaf chewers and aphids can be a problem, but i don't see them here much because of the ladybeetles and birds.
a little bit of rust or fungal diseases can show up, but i don't worry at all if the season is advanced enough. if it is early i'll pull the plant or infected leaves before it spreads. this year it was so hot and dry that i didn't even bother looking for fungal diseases.
if my estimate of the harvest this year is correct one bean gives between a 50 to 75 return.
harvesting by hand is a bit of work, but i like being outside picking. stripping the stalks is not too bad if you wait until the leaves have dried and fallen off and the pods are mostly dry (i.e. not green). i can pick three to four paper bags of pods in several hours. long sleeved shirt required. it's picky and dusty.
the shelling is also dusty, but there are methods for doing that where you can avoid the dust too. i put the dry pods in a pillow case and stomp on them for a while. sort them from the chaff by dumping them from box to box in a good breeze or if it is too windy and rainy i use an inclined plane made out of cardboard and they roll down it as i squish and crumple the pods to get the beans out. i wear thin rubber gloves because the pods will stick to cotton gloves.
i'm sure that beating the pillow case with a baseball bat would probably work too. :)
the usual 90/10 rule applies, to get the first 90% of the beans takes 10% of the time and effort. if i had chickens or pigs i'd not even bother with the last 10% and let them pick through to get those, but as i have both time and patience i end up going for almost every bean i can find in the pods. then later on, i go through and pick out the beans i don't want to use for soymilk and put those in the worm food bucket. the chaff gets recycled back to the gardens one way or another too. it makes good worm bedding eventually. :)
songbird
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Many thanks to all for the responses on how to grow soy beans.
Now, to respond to 'bird:

And possibly also a GMO soy bean do you think?

Was that too late in the season for you or was the alteness a good thing? Are you going to save some of your current harvest for replanting next year?

:-)) Perhaps our cows would like some rather than giving them to my chooks. My chooks get lots of (self serve) greens but will come running at the thought of some animal protein on offer - the cows come for green tidbits if they are in the paddock close to the veg garden :-))

That's a pretty good result.

Thanks 'bird. A very good description. I've forwarded all responses to my email addy for future reference. I might even try some this year if I can squeeze some in somewhere - space is getting a bit on the tight side now.
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FarmI wrote:

you're welcome! :)

yes, of course sold by you know who.

the lateness was not desireable as it means the gardens are tied up for a few weeks longer. like i'm just out now working on most of the large bean patch (where i grew most of the 18 kinds of beans).
it is interesting though that some patches on the dryer soils finished earlier and those are what i'm shelling out now. the pods that are still greenish and drying, i'm not sure what the quality of the beans will be so i'm keeping those separate and for last. they might all end up as worm food. dunno yet. probably a week or two away from even looking at them again.

yes, i'll do that, as next year the fields around us are all going to be corn so the possibilities of contamination from the soybeans in the distant fields will be minimal.
if i can find an earlier variety from an organic source then i'll switch some to test them for taste. and then if the taste is ok, i'll switch the whole crop.
when picking i noticed around 5 different kinds of soybeans (from the shape of the pods, hairyness, color, etc). if the weather gets odd it won't hurt to have some variation in there. i'll probably keep growing at least one patch of these just to keep the seeds available.

i don't even know if they'd eat soybeans or not, but the worms eat them eventually or if they sprout and get chopped down they work for greens.

after getting so little return at the bank it's nice to have something that does well.

questions always ok, this e-mail address is good.
songbird
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There's a Seed Savers group in the US so it might be worth trying them to see if they ahve any other varieties.

LOL. I dont' know what the interest rate is on my money. So long as it's not negative and i'm losing money, I can live with a low return as I dont' touch capital anyway.

Thank you for the kind offer.
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FarmI wrote:

good idea. i'll give them a look.

i can live with it too as i know it won't be going like this forever.
growing dry beans means i can be a true bean counter when the currencies of the world all go *boom!* at the same time. :)

you're welcome,
songbird
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