Trained Fruit tree forms and yields.

I have taken on a plot of land 12meters square and intend planting it as a small fruit orchard, with apples, pears, plums, cherries and gooseberries as a surrounding hedging (keeps the 2 legged rats at bay ;-). What trained forms, cordons, espalliers, or bushes should yield the heaviest harvests from this site?
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Heaviest yields would be from sutiable varieties grown as bushes - but they take the most space up. Cordons take the least space and hence you can get more varieties. Espaliers are inbetween. However espaliers and cordons are labour intensive.
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Jim Jackson wrote:

it
bay
yield
but
Let me get this straight. You want to make a hedge of gooseberries to stop people pinching your gooseberries. Am I missing something here?
One traditional solution to the two-legged rat problem is Himalayan Giant brambles. The tail-less rodents can help themselves as much as they like on their side, but that won't matter. A bit of effort to keep them within bounds, of course, but probably worth it.
--
Mike.



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More to protect the other fruit really. I think that a 48meter run of gooseberries will provide more than enough for my own needs. Good tip on the brambles though, thanks.
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Thanks Jim, I'd always wondered. So for max number of varieties in a given space go for cordons and for maximum yield go for as big a tree as possible ?
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honeyman wrote:

Or something grafted on a dwarfing rootstock. There are also some family trees with two or more cultivars grafted onto a single rootstock.
They are expensive and a bit more trouble to maintain but you can get heavy crops of two different apples out of the space occupied by a single tree. I have one and it crops surprisingly well. Obviously not as many as on a full sized tree but still more than we can sensibly eat in a season.
Worth choosing the cultivars to suit your local growing conditions.
Regards, Martin Brown
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wrote:

Check out Gene's mini-dwarf apple orchard. It is incredible what he has done to a small urban plot.
http://www.midfex.org/yale/intro.html
-RT
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For fruit trees, the yields would be best with a vigorous rootstock and a full time size tree. However, these trees would not translate well to the trained forms. Dwarf or semi- dwarf would be more appropriate here and the governing factor would be how many branches could be supported. Gene Yale is a member of our Midfex club and he has squeezed close to a hundred varieties of apple trees into his small urban lot, but none of them has espalier form. I hope you are aware that espalier requires a lot of work to set up and maintain.
Sherwin D.
honeyman wrote:

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