Too Wet to Plant?

Hi everyone.
Thanks for all of the good advice so far!
Another question has popped up, though.
This weekend is the frost-free date for my area and I was planning a great weekend of planting. Unfortunately it's been raining for two days and it's not supposed to let up until at least Monday. Needless to say, it's going to be a soggy weekend.
I had planned on planting my corn, cukes, carrots, squash, herbs and a few flowers as well as transplanting the tomatoes. My novice knowledge is telling me that all of the water is going to be ok for germination (the temperature is going to be hovering around 60F/15C).
The question is whether or not this much moisture is ok or will the seeds simply "drown"? Should I wait for some better weather (could be a while)?
I'm using raised beds to I won't be compacting the soil and it does have good drainage.
Thanks.
--
The Good Friar


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Friar Donk wrote:

Hard to say without knowing how much rain is falling. What has fallen and what is forecast?
Also, some plants don't need the frost free date to plant. Stuff like carrots can go into the ground the moment you can work the soil. Which is especially important for carrots cause they need a long season (and can stay in the ground until it snows).
Around here, I plant almost everything six weeks before the last frost-free date (~10 June). We still get below zero temps at night now, and I have my carrots, turnips, potatoes, peas and onions in the ground (since May 1st). They've all sprouted and are doing well.
My tomatoes and corn will go into the greenhouse as soon as the nursery has seedlings available (this week hopefully).
..
Zone 5b in Canada's Far East.
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On Thu, 17 May 2007 10:33:49 -0230, cloud dreamer wrote:

So far about 10mm of rain has fallen in two days, with 30mm expected over the next five (about 5mm per day, off and on).
The actual forecast is here:
http://www.theweathernetwork.ca/features/gardening/pages/CANS0164.htm

I have some carrots, spinach, lettuce and peas happily growing as I planted them a few weeks ago, but I try to stagger plantings so I have a continuous supply.

Hm. Looks like you're in my neighborhood, perhaps a little farther north.
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Friar Donk wrote:

That forecast wouldn't dissuade me very much. Forecasts of 50 or 100 mm would raise an eyebrow, but 30 mm spread over several days would just mean you don't have to water for the first week at least. The temperatures are spot on too....and yeah...I'm drooling over the double digits there....<sigh>

Yeah. I stagger my turnip and peas. The carrots take so %&$*# long up here, they're in the moment the ice pick cracks the surface.

Yup. Land of ice, rock and short carrots.
;)
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Are we talking Newfoundland? And are you calling turnips what I call rutabaga? My last trip up there was 3 years ago in October and the roadside stands were selling "turnips". Of course we call them rutabaga down here. I have to admit that seeing corn on the cob in a "tin" was a new one on me!! I have been up there twice and absolutley fell in love with the place...St Johns and the Avalon was all I got to see though...hopefully will someday get a chance to visit again!!
"Yeah. I stagger my turnip and peas The carrots take so %&$*# long up here, they're in the moment the ice pick cracks the surface. Zone 5b in Canada's Far East. Hm. Looks like you're in my neighborhood, perhaps a little farther north. Yup. Land of ice, rock and short carrots.
http://community.webtv.net/viditom/FlowersJuly172006
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diane wrote:

Yeah. They sell rutabagas commercially, but I make sure I buy seeds labeled turnip...usually Purple Top. I'm assuming if it's labeled turnip then it's turnip. Usually whiter on the inside than the rutabaga. I guess I was as surprised to see a real corn on a cob when I moved to the prairies in the 80s as you were seeing them in a tin. Didn't strip an ear of corn until I was in my 20s. When I was growing up, I never saw fresh brocolli, califlower or any of the "exotic" fruits...like green bananas. They just couldn't ship it here fast enough. No problems today...thankfully.
I'm on the Avalon, west of St. John's. Spent eleven years living across the country and had to come back. There's no place like it....but as they say...you can take the boy out of the bay but you can't take the bay outta the boy...(or girl... :)
;)
Zone 5b in Canada's Far East
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LOL can ya send me any cod tongues? I think I ate them 10 days straight last trip up there!! You do grow califlower and brocilli now I'm assuming? Your climate is about like mine (without the winds) so I'd think you'd have better luck with the cold weather crops then the "exotics". Can't grow melons here and have to plant early maters too!...50 miles south of northern Ontario!! Can't hide my addy so feel free to mail me,,,
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