Too late to plant garlic in Seattle?

I haven't gotten around to planting my garlic yet. Would I get good results if I planted it now?
Bob
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Depends on where you are.
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Ann
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Yes. You can plant it anytime the ground isn't frozen. Go for it.
How bad did that storm system tear up Seattle? We're hearing that you guys got pretty significant wind.
Jan in Alaska
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Oops, my bad. ;-> Long day at the studio.....
If your ground isn't frozen then yes, I would think you'd be fine planting them now. Once the ground freezes, mulch it over with a good organic mulch like chopped leaves to keep them tucked in for the winter. I planted mine mid-November, which is kinda late for around here, but they should be ok. Good growing!
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Ann
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I'm in Seattle, and I've had mine in now for about 60 days. The stalks are about a foot high. Will they make it through OK to spring like that? Or, is it best to plant a late crop of garlic at the start of winter?
-- Robert Pearson ParaMind Brainstorming Software http://www.paramind.net Creative Virtue Press/Telical Books/Regenerative Music http://www.rspearson.com
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On Fri, 7 Dec 2007, RS wrote:

The unnamed variety will probably do just fine. Of course, we never know if there might be a really hard snap without snow cover - so I generally mulch the whole area to moderate any plunging soil temperatures.
    -f
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On Tue, 4 Dec 2007, Bob F wrote:

I've never planted them this late, so I can only speculate.
Assuming the current warm spell lasts for a week, and your soil isn't completely soggy (you don't want to drown the cloves!) you'd probably get something reasonable. You will probably get some soil compaction. Don't disturb the soil any more than absolutely necessary. A dibbler would be better than digging a row.
Mine (in Green Lake area) is mostly still below ground surface level, a few from one variety show shoots. These were planted in October.
Good luck!     -f
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