tomatoes really resistant to cold weather?

Are there any tomato breeds that are more resistant than others to cold weather? I am wondering if any of them could come close to being perennial, even if their fruit were kind of small, or berry-like?
That way they'd almost count as perennials.
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I have never heard of any that will survive a major frost. Your only option is a greenhouse.
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Hi All, if the frost does not see them off the blight will. as the winter gets cold and more to the point damp. I have never had any survive through the winter even in a green house. having said that the green house is not heated. may be heat would make a difference, but would it be economic to have heat on ?. it would not for me so I have not done it. hope this helps you.
Richard M. Watkin.
wrote:

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The three tomatoes I had in my greenhouse I planted last November in 3 gallon pots... I bought them in 4" pots.
They wintered just fine even with all the "damp" in the greenhouse! They are now blooming and setting nicely. :-)
I opened the front screen door during the day when it was above freezing to let the house dry out a bit and at night, I ran a single 75 watt lightbulb in a clip lamp to heat it.
The greenhouses don't have to be kept really warm, just warm enough to keep the inside temp above 32 degrees! They got down to maybe 40 at the lowest even on the coldest nights.
My greenhouses are 8' x 8' x 7'.
Kat

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In article

The Russian tomato varieties do better in cool weather. Look at the Territorial Seeds website -- they sell a bunch of Russian varieties.
Also, if you live near the coast, composting seaweed right on your garden beds will lower the temp that plants can survive by a few degrees. Or buy kelp fertilizers. (If you can get actual seaweed, you don't need to hose the salt water off it. Just layer it on your beds and let it rot or dig it in, or mulch the beds in the fall with it.)
Jan, in coastal Alaska USDA Zone 3
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