Tomato varieties.

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gigantic,
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No greenhouse as of yet... though I've been pondering the idea. Next year I'll start them 6 weeks early. Considering how large those plants were, I'm surprised how well they're doing. I was planning for the worse, and started a 2nd batch with 3 weeks left to planting. Those ones are doing ok, though they haven't caught up to the first batch. I couldn't manage to give away quite all the extras, and I couldn't bring myself to snuff them, so they're a little crowded.

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That I'll do also. The larger seedlings had a tough time standing up on their own.

Ruby
Thanks, I'll check those out.

finger
I'd never seen one of those before, but looked it up. Nasty looking critter.
So far I've been lucky. The only insect problem I've noticed so far with my tomatoes is ants, which I had last year. So far this year, I haven't seen any.
Last year I had a rabbit get in and destroy my 4 Roma seedlings, which I started. At least it was just the Romas, and not something like my 1884s, which I couldn't buy a replacement for. The rabbits can't get in the garden anymore. In retaliation, it seems they've decided to trash my wife's flowers in the front of the house.
Gary

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Pat Kiewicz wrote:

Me too! I've NEVER had hornworms here in 10 years and all of a sudden I picked off about 8 of them. What's up with that?
Mary
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I really like Stupice. I usually order the seeds from Cooks Garden. We've had good luck with it here near foggy SF so short season tomatoes work best for us.

I agree with the person who suggested Black Krim. It is very tasty. Usually for yellows I grow yellow pear or cherry tomatoes. I haven't grown too many slicers.
We also really like Pineapple - it's a yellow/red mottled tomato and is one of my favorites to eat.
Green Zebra is also a big favorite with us.
You might enjoy browsing the variety of tomato seeds at www.tomatofest.com Just scroll down towards the bottom of the home page for the link to "tomato seeds". He gives a pretty good description of the tomatoes and sells seeds for 450 varieties. You can also browse by tomato color, so maybe you'll get some good leads on yellow or black/purple that way.
marcella
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snipped-for-privacy@peek.org says...

Stupice is good, but I've tried both it and Moskvich and had better and earlier yields with Moskvich. But as you say, it depends a lot on local conditions.
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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wrote:

grow
I ordered some Stupice seeds.. though I ordered seeds for more varieties than I had room to plant. Next year I'll be digging up more sod.. perhaps this year when it cools off a little.

Any
That one sounds very interesting. Added to the list.

I grew those last year. They were very good, and I am growing them again this year.

Thanks for the link. Looks like a great site.. judging from the few minutes I glanced around.
Gary

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three that i plant every year: amish paste- heirloom, large paste, extra tasty sweet cherry 100-burpee.. just like the name says chuck's roma-heirloom large, meaty paste...for sauce hth good luck, jim book

Any
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Thanks for those suggestions, Jim.
They're added to the list. There have been so many great suggestions.. I hope I have the room to try them all.
Gary
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don' snipped-for-privacy@there.com writes:

The blacks are among my favorites. The first black was Black Russian and was incredible. Since that year, I've tried many others including Black Krim which always has one plant in my garden. There'd be more if there were more room.<g> If you have not tried Sun Gold, be sure to try it, a wonderful orange very sweet tomato. Because it grows so large and is so prolific, it's a natural if there are small children around. They can pick them like berries, just the right size for little hands . . . and soooooo good!

Well, actually, they will taste the same, still like plastic. <g>
Glenna loving heirlooms!
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Glenna Rose wrote:

Ooooooo... I've just planted this for the first time and I've a few that are almost ready. I can't wait to try it. My youngest (2.5yo) loves tomatoes so she'll be right in line behind me.
Mary
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snipped-for-privacy@munged.munged writes:

Oh, Gary, please don't call that binging. I even take a couple of smaller cucumbers to work with me and eat them on the way home. Leaving them in the trunk keeps them cool (have been too lazy to put a small cooler in there for them). With a cup of frozen yogurt (thawed by noon but cool) for lunch and cucumbers on the way home, appetite for more filling (meaning filling out) things is considerably reduced. (And, of course, lots of ice water!)
Eating lots of tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, and onions is *not* binging . . . . please tell me it's not! (Actually, it sounds a bit like salsa.<g>)
Glenna
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snipped-for-privacy@pmug.org (Glenna Rose) wrote:

For diebetics and low-carbers (same thing realistically) it is binging on something your body simply misbehaves with. Wonderful, natural sugars.

DiGiTAL ViNYL (no email) Zone 6b/7, Westchester Co, NY, <1 mile off L.I.Sound 2nd year gardener http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/royalfrazier /
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writes:

regimen
Hehe. Maybe I could have termed it differently. When the veggies are ripe, I take them to work pretty much every day to have with my lunch.
A couple of my 1884's are starting to turn. The flavor of those is absolutely incredible. Can't wait.
I like to see the looks I get when I slice up a 1 pound-plus tomato durning lunch at work!
Gary
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Yellow Brandywine is my favorite yellow & Cherokee Purple is a must try. Steve

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Thanks, Steve.
Both of those are added to my list. Yup. Definitely need to cut up more sod.
Gary
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Here's a great place to get some unusual vegetable seed, tomato too.
http://www.territorial-seed.com/ter/stores/1/index.cfm
Spark

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snipped-for-privacy@woodplanet.com writes:

Last year, I put a cattle panel up beside several of my tomato plants which worked very well. I supported it in two places with metal fence posts. This year, I had made a sort of hoop house of one and was not at all happy with it so removed the plastic. I left it in place and planted my Sun Golds and other cherry-type tomato plants at each corner. It is working wonderfully. If it were a normal year, I'd have a completely covered tomato arbor at this point.
FYI, a cattle panel is 16 feet long, four feet high, with 8-inch mesh. Because it is designed to keep large farm animals where they belonged, it is heavy duty. Unlike rebar, it does not rust as it is a fence. In our area, the panels sell for just under $20. They will last indefinitely.
If I had the intestinal fortitude and strong hands and heavy duty lineman's cutters, I'd made some great cages of the panels. Even cut to place as four-feet long pieces shaped to a right angle would work well and stack very well in the off season. Supports could be eight feet tall getting two from each panel if one wanted them that tall (or three 6-ft cages). Of course, the tomatoes would need additional training with only two sides. Metal electrical conduit cut to the appropriate height would work well as a stabilizer (stake).
This year, where I had the tomato plants on the cattle panel last year, I have cucumbers with the pepper plants between the cucumbers and the walkway. Many of you have also had a bumper year of cucumbers so can imagine how well this has worked for those.
I had planned to have one on one side of the garden for raspberry vines but didn't get it done this year, but it should work well for those as well.
This year has definitely not been my best tomato year though I must admit I've had no bad tomato years, just late ripening this year as everyone else seems to have had.
Those Sun Golds are definitely keepers . . . and plant-againers. :-)
Glenna
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On Sat, 21 Aug 2004 22:59:57 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@pmug.org (Glenna Rose) wrote:
(snip)

I picked up some cages like that at an auction. Somebody else had made them from the cattle panels. They're about 5 feet tall and about 4 feet on a side. Nice and strong.

Have you tried making a trellis from the cattle panels? Just put two fence posts in the ground about 8 feet apart, then put the panel over them, making a hoop of it with the ends held down by the bottoms of the fence posts. It makes a nice trellis for cucumbers, peas, and anything else you want to let climb on it. (snip)
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