Tomato seed germination time?

I have potted my first few tomato seeds here in Scotland, UK, and I am wondering how long they take to germinate?
They are in seed compost/vermiculite in a propagator without heater. It's been pretty cold at night and not too warm in the day. I've been moving it around to catch whatever sun I can find, which isn't a lot at the moment.
6 days and counting so far...
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Don't tomato seeds need to be kept fairly warm for germination? I put mine in a heated propogator, indoors, next to a window. They took about 7 to 10 days to germinate and are now growing on by the window in an unheated propogator.
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DanielCoffey wrote:

You will def. need some sort of consistent warmth. Toms like it warm/hot.
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On Thu, 06 Apr 2006 10:19:34 GMT, DanielCoffey

US zone 7 in a greenhouse it has taken 12 to 15 days. The greenhouse was kept at about 50F at night. As soon as the sun came up it was in the 80's.
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Susan N.

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snipped-for-privacy@blueyonder.co.uk writes:

If they are in pots, try keeping them inside, at least at night, until they have a good start. I started my seeds inside (first part of March); most were up in about a week (I was surprised). After they germinated, I took the trays outside during the day and put them in a temporary cold frame (4x4 lumber with a window over them), bringing them back in at night. A couple of weeks ago, I started leaving them out all the time (cool but not freezing temps at night). They are not gaining much in height right now - not like they will a month from now - but they are looking healthy and "stout" (not spindly like in past years when I kept them inside). By doing it this way, they had the benefit of the warmth for the initial growth and the sunlight to keep them from getting "leggy" and has seemed to work well. It seems logical that the very healthy look to the leaves means there is a good healthy root system growing as well. Three weeks ago, I planted some of the cauliflower plants in the garden in coffee can "hot houses" (ends cut off and the translucent plastic lid on top); they have done surprisingly well. It is still chilly here, but they are looking healthy though still small. I suspect when it is warmer, they will do better than what I might have purchased at the nursery.
This has been considerably more work (walking them out and back in each day!), but so far it seems to working. By being outside, they have light all around them equally so aren't "reaching" for the light and growing evenly. This isn't scientific, and I've certainly not seen it in any hints column, but it seems to be working. And, yes, it's a bit messy with all those trays sitting inside each evening, but the results in the next few months will be worth it! After all, isn't gardening really one big experiment with conditions different year-to-year and location-to-location (even in the same yard)? Some things work, some things don't, some work in spite of us humans.<g>
My greenhouse should finally be built this year, and I'm thinking seriously about spending the extra money to put heating coils (designed for flooring) in the shelves. It will make the shelves much heavier but will keep the soil warm in the pots and the greenhouse warmer overall than it would be otherwise and should work as well as what I did this spring. Because the heat will be more consistent, it will probably work much better.
Glenna (Pacific Northwest, U.S.A., Portland, Oregon, area)
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My records show fresh tomato seed germinate in four days.
I sow the seed about 6 weeks ahead of transplanting to the garden, in trays filled with peat-based potting soil, covered with a clear plastic lid and placed ~10" under a 65W grow light.
Tomat seedlings like warm nights, where the minimum temperature is above 55F (~13C). If it/s still cold where you are, then there/s plenty-o-time to replant.
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On Thu, 6 Apr 2006 21:48:55 -0400, "TQ" <ToweringQs AT adelphia.net> wrote:

Day 7 and the first seeds are above the soil! My two Paul Robesons were first out - the other varietes aren't showing yet.
As for 13C nighttime temperatures, I'm afraid that in Scotland we only get that sort of temperature at night for a few brief weeks in August if we're lucky. In fact, our daytime temps aren't even that high yet. Daytime shows 6-9C with nights at 3-4C with some light frosts. As a result I went for tomatoes more suited to shorter growing seasons (Paul Robeson/Patio Orange/Golden Nugget).
Thanks for the reassuring comments though, folks - I am really looking forward to seeing these grow.
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On Fri, 07 Apr 2006 08:22:56 GMT, DanielCoffey

Day 9 and the Golden Nuggets have popped up! Phew!
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And on day 11 one of the Patio Orange popped up - a little careful poking revealed that my spare second one hadn't germinated so I picked a replacement seed.
I'm delighted to get such a good turn-out from my first seeds - now to make sure I don't overwater them - the first out of the soil Paul Robeson are almost 2" high and have started on their second set of leaves.
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On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 10:42:53 GMT, DanielCoffey

Give them more light. Two inches before starting second leaves is getting leggy.
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Susan N.

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My house was build with the hot water heater, and the house heater in the same small room. It maintains a constant 72F/22C temperature in there. I put up some small shelves and a small light and start my seeds there. As soon as they are up, I remove them to a room that gets a lot more sunlight.
Dwayne

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Tomatos are suppost to germinate in about a week or so, give them some time. If the tomatos dont grow in 2 weeks plant some new ones. I have planted tomatos before and they germinated fine for me. If they dont grow its probably because of a bad seed.
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tomatos need some warmth for germination.It is bette that you try with warm enviornment
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Oh Danny-Boy, if you have a small heating blanket, put it under the pot.Get a thermometer, stick it in the soil and keep the temp at 70 degrees F. If the heating blanket is too warm make sure it's at the lowest setting. If not buy one with a 3 setting control (Low,Med,High). Seeds shouldn't take any longer than 5 days.
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