tomato problems - please help

I've planted tomatoes in two different locations this year, and each seems to have its own set of problems.
1. I planted some close to my house. They have grown well and have developed some fruit, but some of the newer leaves have developed brown spots. On some branches the brown spots have spread and caused all of the leaves on that branch to shrivel and dry up. I tried spraying with a fungicide/insect spray, but it didn't seem to help.
2. I planted some in a sunny part of the yard, but after a promising start the l;eaves began to turn yellow and the growth of the plants was stunted. Several years earlier I had planted cucumbers in the same spot, and while they did well the first year, the second year they started out ok but then all the leaves turned yellow and they died.
Can anyone give a hint as to what might be causing these problems, and what I can do about it?
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wrote:

The second link is a tomato FAQ, but I still think you might have a better chance of identifying what's going on with a book of quality color photos of common problems. :) (Especially since you haven't link any pictures of your plants.)
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On Tue, 01 Jun 2004 23:39:38 GMT, "David or Eunice Boucher"

Did the house ever have oil heat? Oil barrel ever set there at one point? Of course many things can cause the same symptoms but since I've seen plants growing over petroleum contaminated soil that did that, that's what came into my head first.
It's probably something else, but I replied as it may not be mentioned by someone else.
Janice
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from what I have read even those heavy duty types are poor miticides. You need to know what your trying to manage. Which I understand IS the problem.
Your local Ag Extension office may be the best to assist you in finding the trouble.
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Planting vegetables close to the house is generally not a good idea. You almost always have problems of (1)not enough sun,(2)too much sun/heat radiated from brick, or (3)brick mortar left in the soil leaching lime and changing the soil pH to an alkaline level.

Leaves turning yellow often indicates a lack of nitrogen or iron.

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I'd say in case #2, the soil is poor and/or deficeint in 1 or more micros. I'd mix in some peat with a spoon of lime/plant and a dash of micronutrients. Lime is better added 4-6 months earlier than planting. In case #1, I'd be guessing that wash off from the roof may have something to do with it since most shingles today are treated with antifungals which may not be the most congenial showers for tomato plants. Gary

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