Tomato Plants Dying

Hello all,
First of all, i'm a newbie. i just moved into a house from an apartment, and the idea of having an organic kitchen garden has always excited me, so i built one, and i've got a few crops going now that are coming out well so far.
The okra, pumpkin vines, spearmint, pepper, and basil plants are thriving in the soil, and doing very well. I live in central Florida.
My problem: my Heatwave tomato plants have wilted over the past 2 days, even with the same amount of water and plant food and temperature that they're used to. the only thing different i can imagine is that a few days ago i bought some Round Up that said it was safe for use in flower and vegetable gardens to kill some grass and weeds that had popped up around the tomato plants. However i didn't use much of it, just enough to get the grass and weed seedlings, and i thought it should be safe around the plants. but as of now the tomato plants have their leaves drooped down, very weak and soft, and they look pretty pathetic.
The other plants that i did not spray the roundup near are doing well still.
Would that have caused the problem, or can you imagine anything else? Is there anything i can do to reverse them wilting and dying before it's too late?
Thanks!
Paul
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I thought you said organic kitchen garden...Round Up doesn't sound to organic to me....that could very well be your problem there...

How much water & "plant food". What type food? If your weather is like mine in NC, then it might just be about time for the tomatoes to go...
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Round up is an organic chemical, see the formula below,
MOLECULAR FORMULA: C3 H8 NO5 P (glyphosate); C6 H17 N2 O5 P (glyphosate-mono(isopropylammonium)) (62).
There are three carbon atoms in glyphosate and six in glyphosate-mono (isopropylammonium.
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Roundup is not organic.

You need to pull weeds, not use chemicals, especially around food. The tomatoes are toast, pull them and learn.

Then don't spray near them and they'll be fine.
Go to the library and get a book on organic gardening, there are many. One universal theme is no use of chemicals to control weeds, and no chemical fertilizer to feed the plants, instead, you feed the soil with compost and mulches. There is much more, read and ask questions.
--
Ann
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Thanks for the input. As i said, i'm a newbie, i didn't even think about the fact that the stuff to kill weeds would be just as bad as insecticides. I've been using an organic "insecticide" which contains canola oil and sesame oil that i spray on the leaves to prevent caterpillars and such.
So, let's forget the organic thing, even in a non-organic garden Round Up doesn't actually work without killing the plant?
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It'll kill most any green thing it touches.
--
Ann
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And that is the obvious, immediate effect of this poison.
It also has a delayed,not good effect on on other colored things it touches, be they brown, black, pinkish, etc........
Monsanto Kills.
Charlie
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Also, how do you feed with compost after they've been planted? I've mixed compost in the soil when i plant them, but can i just sprinkle compost near the base and they'll absorb it?
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For annuals like tomatoes, mixing a suitable amount of compost into the soil at the start of each season should be enough. It is naturally slow-release, especially if you avoid washing out nutrients by excessive watering.
For perennials like turf grass, flowers, etc, or if you prefer not to till, yes you can spread compost on the soil and let the rain and earthworms distribute nutrients. One common version of this is to mulch with an organic mulch like wood chips, leaves, coffee grounds, etc, and let it eventually decompose. You can also fertilize with liquid organic fertilizers like compost tea, compost leachate, or fish emulsion.
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Thanks, Jim! Good to know. I appreciate the helpful info!
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Fish emulsion is good for nitrogen but the others don't supply it. You need to add manure or rotate crop with legumes (beans, peas, clover, ect) that are nitrogen fixers.
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Billy

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Roundup is safe to plant in the NEXT day, but I would not reccomend using it withing 20' of growing plants.

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Many of us don't recommend using this poison at all.
RoundUp is not safe for children and other living things.
Monsanto Kills.
Charlie
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Round Up will kill any plant whose leaves it gets on. I have used it in my tomato beds with no problem. I have a dispenser which puts out a foam. I put the wand almost on the weed and it does not spread to the neighboring plants.
Check out this site for information on tomato problems. http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/tomatoproblemsolver/index.html And check with your local extension service. You can locate yours here. http://www.csrees.usda.gov/Extension/index.html
Last year I swore that my husband got Round Up on some of my tomatoes. After we talked to a biologist I realized that it was not Round Up but some other problem.
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Susan N.

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com writes:

I am curious. If you are going to all that trouble to spray the weed, why don't you just pull it/them? It makes so much more sense to me to do that since you are taking the time anyway. Just for the record, it is a serious question, not a criticism. When I see weeds out there, I just start pulling them. They go great in the compost bin or into the chicken yard I guess there is a sort of therapy in pulling them up; if the area is freshly watered, it's so easy.
Glenna
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On Sep 3, 2:34 am, snipped-for-privacy@pmug.org (Glenna Rose) wrote:

I have done that, but like all americans i guess i wanted to take the lazy way out. didn't work out in my favor. from now on i'm pulling them. as i said, i'm a newbie to this.
Only half of my 16 tomato plants died, and the other 8 are doing relatively well.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com writes:

I wish you much success for the rest of your gardening. We newbies do some things we later consider a bit odd later as we learn more. I remember the first year I had this house (closed in May) and my first almost garden which consisted of only tomato plants in an area about 10x10 feet. I knew nothing much at all, planted the tomato plants about two feet apart (yep!), had not a clue about cages or such. After all, my grandparents grew tomatoes for market, acres of them, and didn't stake. So much for determinate versus indeterminate of which I knew nothing. You plant, it grows, simple. In theory. LOL! When the plants went all over the place, my husband said, "Why do you think they call them *vines*?" So much for that. Also, that first year, I treated them like they were truly fragile, something I find very amusing now - as long as we are reasonably careful, they usually do very well. My husband, who had worked at a large-city sewage treatment plant when it was being expanded in the seventies, also said to me, "Remember how I told you at the plant, we'd have tomato plants randomly growing? Those came from seeds in the sewage." Well, that's food for thought regarding their hardiness considering the extreme treatment of the processing done.
I even talked to them as I put them in the ground. Still do, but not for the same reason, now it's just out of habit rather than thinking it will make a difference.<g> If one could put a clip of me planting that first tomato plant next to the one of the way I plant now, it would be comical. That is not to say I'm careless, just realistic. I still dig the large planting hole, mix a little fertilizer (natural), a handful of sweet lime (calcium) into the bottom of the planting hole, fill it with water, set in the plant, fill it again, and fill in the dirt, and thinking nothing more about it. I just don't do it like the world depends on it. After laying the soaker hose, mulching, adding the cages, all that is left is to turn on the faucet for water, pull a few weeds (mulch keeps them at a minimum) and harvest.
Around here (Portland, Oregon, area), we have had a cool August so it has only been this past week that our tomatoes have been getting ripe. Up until now, one would have thought it was early or mid-July. Mine were at the end of August like the usual third week of July! Now that we have had some seasonal weather, the tomatoes (and everything else) are responding very well. Now, if we can only have enough warm weather left for most of the green tomatoes to ripen, that will be good.
You will find each year is completely different. The best thing is to just keep on doing it and noting the results from what you have done each year. As I said, I wish you much luck and success and satisfaction from your gardening endeavors.
Glenna

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On Sep 4, 11:09 am, snipped-for-privacy@pmug.org (Glenna Rose) wrote:

Thanks! I am learning what not to do more than i'm learning what TO do. But my other plants are doing really well, so i'm not disappointed that i'll just have to try and have a strong crop of tomatoes next season. After all, it is a bit late to get them started again now, right? I do live in florida, so it's hot or at least warm until mid- december.
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Tomatoes require a fairly narrow nighttime temperature to set their fruit, and reasonably warm weather to do much growing. So I don't really know Florida, but I'd probably think in terms of planting cool weather crops at this time of year. Things like Spinach and Kale you probably can grow all winter (even here in Washington, DC, we can grow them well into the fall and early in the spring).
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