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Hi Katra,

I don't like to kill animal, so I just wrap rat with newspaper and throw it outside our fence to a bush, it will decompose to nothing left within two months. The glue on rat will stick it with the newspaper and make it unescapetable. I know this will make the rat suffer, but as long as I don't see it with my eye, it's OK for me. Think at it, most of my transplant are lost due to those rats, this make me feel less guilty.
Rats here like to chew my transplant and even pull the transplant out from soil.
Regards, Wong
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I agree... The rats have made it difficult to transplant corn sprouts! :-P I usually just toss the trap into a bucket of water and walk away for 10 minutes or so. If I don't have to watch, I can handle it.
When I catch rats by hand, I grab them by the tail and hit them hard against the nearest cinder block or tree, and that kills them.
The other morning, I found two nests and managed to kill one adult female and 16 young rats that way. I watch carefully for nesting sites and clean them out about once every couple of weeks.
K.
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il Wed, 12 May 2004 00:43:14 -0500, Katra ha scritto:

Gee where do you guys live? I have yet to *see* a rat. Let alone need to kill one. yuck what a topic....
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Central Texas, suburbs...
I have chickens, they are attracted to the grain feed. There is nothing I can do about that. I just have to find more efficient ways to kill the little SOB's. They are very prolific.
K.
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il Thu, 13 May 2004 01:48:59 -0500, Katra ha scritto:

I wonder if they make the pill for rats. Biocontrol. :-)
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That would be nice...
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wrote:

The general trick is to store the grain in a metal trash can or something like that. Also, those dangling metal tube feeders work well -- as long as the rat can't climb down whatever it is you dangle the feeder from.
We had rats in our henhouse when I was a kid. My dad made a bait box with a hole that's large enough for a rat to enter, but would keep a chicken out. He put anticoagulant (warfarin) type rat poison into the box every day. Sick and dying rats literally came out of the woodwork after a few days.
It takes more than one dose to kill the rats, so the secret is to buy five pounds or more of rat pellets, then keep the bait box filled. Just putting out a box or two of d-con won't do it. The rats just get sick, then get over it.
After a while, the dead rats stopped appearing and the poison pellets stopped disappearing. We haven't had rat problems since then.
Ray
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That would be ok, but a lot of grain ends up on the ground, especially scratch feed. My storage is metal containers as rats would chew thru plastic.

Yes, that works. I use bar bait poisons and put them into suet cages, and place them so that the chickens cannot get to them, or get to the crumbs. You also have to make it so that the rats cannot carry off the bars so the chickens might gain acess to them, hence the suet cages. :-)

When I start poisoning, yes, I do use a lot of it. The rats start dying after about 5 days and die near water containers pretty much out in the open, which is nice as dead rast _stink_! :-P Bleeding to death makes them thirsty.

Mine is periodic. I can wipe out the local population, but my neighbors don't use any rat control and there is a lot of trash in the lots out back. :-( Nothing I can do about that except for complaining to the city, so the rats re-populate about every 2 years. This year is just really bad!!! I am going on a major poison spree here shortly, and will also set up some bucket drowning traps as was suggested earlier.
Thanks for the input. :-)
K.
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Ah, good time to use the water traps to ensure the job :)
~REZ~
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (Rez) wrote:

Yep! ;-)
K.
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LOL! Not me, I've had enough stuff destroyed by rats, mice, and rabbits, that it doesn't bother me one bit to watch 'em suffer :)

Works for me :)

Probably as good a control method as any.
Fortunately where I am now, there don't seem to be any rats, tho there are mice in droves (they demolished my cauliflower, and those were BIG plants, almost 3 feet tall) and of course the Starving Attack Rabbits. I encourage "safe" snakes (tho I've got 14 rattlers in my trophy box, in just two years time!) and just picked up a couple feral cats who both have litters, hopefully enough kittens will not get eaten by owls to grow up and become good mousers. You can't grow cats fast enough around here... :(
Tho beware of snakes around chickens, I have personally SEEN gopher snakes rob nests for eggs, and even fight the hen for the eggs! and snakes can CLIMB!
~REZ~
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (Rez) wrote:

<cringe> I hate rats, but I can't stand to watch any animal suffer...

Quick too.

Keeping tabs on nesting areas is imperative! They mature quickly too, but I let a nest be used before I clear it out, so that way I can kill the babies rather than having them have them someplace I'd not be able to access.

You are lucky!

Texas rat snakes do that too. ;-)
K.
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wrote:

If you want to do things by hand, one of those propane weed burners ought to do well -- and you won't have to touch the animal.
Ray
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But they might escape! :-P Enough get away as it is if I wait too long to check the nests.
If they are small enough, the chickens enjoy eating baby rats. <G>
I've gotten pretty good at the snatch them by the tail and bash them killing method.
But, thanks anyhoo! :-)
K.
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il Tue, 11 May 2004 03:02:35 -0500, Katra ha scritto:

I had smart mice who could remove the bait without springing the trap. So for a while I baited it but left it unsprung so they'd get careless. Eventually I set the trap, tied the bait on to make it hard remove, put the trap between two objects making a corridor that just fit the trap width (to cut down the space for manouvering). That seemed to work. Maybe that would work for rats.
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I have to be cautious with snap traps. The rats are mostly in the hen yard and I have pigeons. :-P
That is why I have to be SO careful with poison baits. I use the bar bait and put it into suet cages so the rats cannot carry it off, and make sure it stays under cover with crumb control.
Still scares me. :-( And I think I lose the occasional bird to it when I do start poisoning even tho' I'm ever so careful!
K.
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Try a livetrap, baited with dog food (put the dog food into a glass jar with a metal lid with holes punched in it, so the rats can smell it real well but can't eat it), the kind that can catch several rats per load. The smell of rats attracts more rats, especially if one dies and the rest start eating it. (Same goes for mice.)
You can get livetraps made of sheet metal which removes temptation from birds (since they can't see into it). Tomahawk Trap Co. might make some, not sure. I have some of their wire traps that I use for pest rabbits.
~REZ~
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (Rez) wrote:

Live traps don't work well for Norway rats...
They are too smart. Been there, done that, caught a few youngsters but no adults. :-(
K.
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Norway rats are probably smarter than roof rats, which is what we had where I used to live. Roof rats are so bold they run around in packs in broad daylight. They're not very big tho, a little smaller than typical "pet rats".
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (Rez) wrote:

These are as large or slightly larger than pet rats, and they are pretty smart and bold. Mostly nocturnal, they don't always run away right away when I find them, which is why I can hand-kill from time to time.
I think they are catching on tho'. :-( It's been harder for me to capture them lately.
K.
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