tomato black spot

Each year, my tomatoes have a black rotten spot on the lower side that ruins half the crop. Does this indicate some kind of soil deficiency; if so, what. Also this year, I plan to use black plastic sheet mulch with pine bark mulch on top of that. I haven't ever did this before so I can't predict the results. If nothing else, it looks good and keeps the weeds out.
Bill
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Bill:
Sounds like blossom end rot.
Calcium deficiency. You can spray calcium on the flowers as well as using soil additives.
John!

ruins
what.
mulch on

results. If

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John is right, of course, but the problem is also made worse by uneven moisture in the soil. I have been growing all my tomatoes through black plastic mulch for several years now and blossom end rot is no longer a problem. Bill, if you follow your plan to use the black plastic, you might try doing nothing else the first year. If the problem still exists, then try a calcium spray. Do you suppose your soil is deficient in calcium? Do you ever test your soil to see if you should be adding lime? One more thing, if you live where it gets very hot early in the season, then using the pine mulch over the plastic is good. If you live where the season starts out rather cool, you might leave the pine mulch off until the soil has a chance to warm up a bit.
Steve
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Thanks, Steve, also to John. I think I will do just as you suggested, Steve. Yes, I have tested the ph of the soil. It tested a little high on acid a few years ago so I added lime and the next year it tested ok. Now, I'll have to wait until spring.
Regards, Bill
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On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 20:21:19 GMT, "Bill Orr"

This is my personal experience:
I fertilize tomatoes very early and very lightly when they are planted. I do NOT fertilize while they are growing the green. If you do they will become as tall as pine trees with no fruit. I then watch as the flowers flower and set fruit. Still no more fertilizer. Then as the fruits are full size I fertilize a little with common fertilizer. I conseptually see this as solving the calcium deficiancy. It works for me and keeps the ends from turning black as the fruit ripens from green to red.
Again, my personal experience.
And yes, consistant soil moisture helps the skins from not blowing out and cracking.
HTH
Craig
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