Tiny carrots overwintered--what do I do now?

I had a nice raised bed (3X6 feet) that I planted in carrots late last year. They grew a little bit, and then winter came. They were about an inch long when the frosts started, and have stayed that size all winter. Some of the tops seem to have died; others still look green and healthy.
Now, it is warming up. I want to get some new carrots in as soon as possible, but I don't know what to do with these old ones. Will carrots grow after having been in the ground all winter? Are they like onions in that, when the weather grows warmer, they'll get going again, or is this the end of the line for them? Should I pull out all the little carrots and plant fresh, or will these eventually grow into maturity? If I need to pull them up, should I NOT plant carrots here again, even though the first crop didn't make it to maturity?
I live in southwestern Utah, zone 7 or 8. Thanks in advance for any advice. --S.
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Suzanne D. wrote:

If you like "Queen Anne's Lace", you can leave them and let them bloom. I sometimes stick a few carrots in the flower beds; they can get over 6 feet tall.
Bob
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I don't want flowers; I want carrots. This doesn't really answer my question. Are you saying that the roots will no longer grow, and that I SHOULD pull them out now and replant? Or are you saying that the roots WILL keep growing, but if I leave them too long next summer the tops will flower? I guess I am just asking if I should pull these and replant now, or if they will continue to grow into full sized carrots. Anyone know? --S.
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I'd treat carrots as yearly event.
.
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA






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Yes. Carrots are biennials, and their programming is to make roots the first year and seed the second.
Gary Woods AKA K2AHC- PGP key on request, or at home.earthlink.net/~garygarlic Zone 5/6 in upstate New York, 1420' elevation. NY WO G
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Suzanne D. wrote:

It's too late for the carrots. Even if they do get larger (which I doubt) they will be tough and woody and nasty. All you have now is potential flowers.
Bob
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Thanks everyone. I'll pull them all up and start fresh on our next pleasant day! --S.
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I have a similar group of carrots. I tried to grow them between rows of beans. I'm going to let them grow. My experience with bienials (holly hocks) is that it sometimes takes more than a year for them to get a large enough root to support flowering and going to seed. Of course in zone 3a what I want to do may be moot.
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